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EARTH SCIENCE > Oceans > Bathymetry/Seafloor Topography > Bathymetry

18 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 18
  • The South Georgia Bathymetric Dataset (SGBD) is a continuous grid at 150m resolution of the sea floor around South Georgia. Available in a number of formats and projections, the dataset has been compiled from eleven different data sources.

  • A bathymetric and topographic compilation of the South Sandwich Islands Volcanic Arc (55.1 S - 61.9 S, 24 W - 32 W) constructed in 2014, comprising multiple data sources (see lineage). The data are available as a 200m resolution GeoTIFF grid of elevation data. The bathymetric compilation was constructed in ArcGIS 10.0 using a hierarchical system of data priority, gridded using the Topogrid function and cleaned using both manual and semi-automated methods. This was then merged with terrestrial elevations constructed from cleaned raw ASTER GDEM grids supplemented by coastlines and form-lines taken from archival sketch-maps to produce a full hypsometric elevation model. The dataset was compiled as part of the Geological Long Term Mapping and Survey component of the British Antarctic Survey and forms the basis of a map within the BAS GEOMAP 2 series (see references).

  • This data set contains a bed topography/bathymetric map of Greenland based on mass conservation, multi-beam data, and other techniques. The data set also includes surface elevation, ice thickness and an ice/ocean/land mask. Version 3 includes ocean bathymetry all around Greenland based on data from NASA''s Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) and other campaigns of bathymetry measurements. The subglacial bed topography has also been updated by including more ice thickness data and constraining the ice thickness at the ice/ocean interface based on bathymetry data when available. Greenland''s bed topography is a primary control on ice flow, grounding line migration, calving dynamics and subglacial drainage. Moreover, fjord bathymetry regulates the penetration of warm Atlantic Water (AW) that rapidly melts and undercuts Greenland''s marine-terminating glaciers. This data set presents a new compilation of Greenland bed topography that assimilates seafloor bathymetry and ice thickness data through a mass conservation (MC) approach. A new 150-m horizontal resolution bed topography/bathymetric map of Greenland is constructed with seamless transitions at the ice/ocean interface, yielding major improvements over previous datasets, particularly in the marine-terminating sectors of northwest and southeast Greenland. The map reveals the total sea level potential of the Greenland Ice Sheet is 7.42+/-0.05 m, which is 7 cm greater than previous estimates. Furthermore, it explains recent calving front response of numerous outlet glaciers and reveals new pathways by which AW can access glaciers with marine-based basins, thereby highlighting sectors of Greenland that are most vulnerable to future oceanic forcing. Funding was provided by the UK NERC grant NE/M000869/1.

  • We present a new bathymetric compilation around Ascension Island here defined by the following bounding box: 14.57 to 14.17 W, 8.12 to 7.75 S. This bathymetry grid was compiled from a variety of multibeam swath bathymetry data acquired during 4 different cruises (see lineage). The data is available as a grid of approximately 50 m resolution in two different formats: a GMT-compatible (2-D) NetCDF and Arc/Info and ArcView ASCII grid format using geographic coordinates on the WGS84 datum. Funding was provided by NERC grants NE/J023051/1 and NE/J020303/1

  • We present a new bathymetric compilation of the South Shetland Islands here defined by the following bounding box: 63 to 53.3 W, 63.5 to 60.5 S. This bathymetry grid was compiled from a variety of multibeam swath bathymetry data acquired during 76 different cruises (see lineage). The data is available as a grid of approximately 100 m resolution in two different formats: a GMT-compatible (2-D) NetCDF and Arc/Info and ArcView ASCII grid format using geographic coordinates on the WGS84 datum.

  • We present a bathymetric compilation of Ryder Bay here defined by the following bounding box: 68.48 to 68W, 67.7 to 67.46S. This bathymetry grid was compiled from a variety of multibeam swath bathymetry data acquired during 18 different cruises (see lineage) undertaken by the RRS James Clark Ross. The data is available as a grid of 0.0005 degrees resolution in two different formats: a GMT-compatible (2-D) NetCDF and Arc/Info and ArcView ASCII grid format using geographic coordinates on the WGS84 datum.

  • We present two new gridded bathymetric compilations of the Orkney Passage, Scotia Sea here defined by the following bounding boxes: 39.1 to 39.6 W, 60.55 to 60.7 S and 41.7 to 42.6 W, 60.45 to 60.8 S. These bathymetry grids were compiled from a variety of multibeam swath bathymetry data acquired during 12 different cruises (see lineage). The data is available as grids of 50 m resolution in a GMT-compatible (2-D) NetCDF format using geographic coordinates on the WGS84 datum. This grid was compiled in support of the ongoing monitoring efforts in and around Orkney Passage as part of the Ocean Regulation of Climate by Heat and Carbon Sequestration and Transports (ORCHESTRA) programme and preceding BAS NC projects, and the Dynamics of the Orkney Passage Outflow (DynOPO) project. Funding was provided by the NERC grants NE/K012843/1 and NE/N018095/1 as well as national capability

  • Ship underway data collected aboard the James Clark Ross during cruise no JR158 in 2007. Includes data from navigation and vessel-mounted ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers). On the ship the position and observed data were interpolated to five-second records to merge the navigation with the underway data. These one-minute averages are averages over 12 of the interpolated points.

  • Various data including CTD (Conductivity-Temperature-Depth) profiles, echo-soundings, fishing samples and swath bathymetry were collected onboard ship, during multiple cruises in the Southern Ocean between Oct 2002 and Jan 2006. Sub-surface moorings were deployed with fishing undertaken around mooring positions to ground-truth the acoustic data being collected. Specifically, RMT (Rectangular Mid-water Trawl) hauls were carried out to learn more about the vertical distribution of plankton, krill, mysids and fish around these particular positions during the day and night time. This work took place as part of a project to: a) quantify the magnitude and timing of short-term, ecologically-significant, intra-annual variability in krill abundance at South Georgia; b) describe the effect of oceanic tides at the two locations; c) test the hypothesis that krill immigration to, and hence abundance at, South Georgia is mediated by influx of cold waters; and d) determine functional responses of predators to short term variations in prey (krill) abundance. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is of vital importance to the South Georgia marine ecosystem providing food for a high proportion of Antarctic wildlife, and is eaten by most animals (seals, whales, birds, fish, squid, penguins). This is a parent dataset listing - for individual datasets see: GB/NERC/BAS/PDC/00781 (CTD) GB/NERC/BAS/PDC/00782 (fishing samples) GB/NERC/BAS/PDC/00783 (echo-sounding) GB/NERC/BAS/PDC/00784 (swath bathymetry)

  • Multibeam swath bathymetry data was collected aboard the James Clark Ross between Feb and Mar 2004 (cruise number JR77). The target area was along the eastern segments of the West Scotia Ridge, an ocean spreading centre which stopped spreading about 10 million years ago. The spreading centre has high topographic relief and contains an axial rift, which has flanks that are suitable for dredging. The fieldwork involved mapping the spreading centre using swath bathymetry, and then using this information to locate the best dredging sites. This meant successfully imaging a significant area of hitherto unsurveyed oceanic crust and recovering rocks at 13 dredge sites. The new bathymetric maps add considerably to knowledge of the West Scotia Ridge.