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EARTH SCIENCE > Hydrosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets

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  • Polar View delivers a range of environmental information services for the polar regions derived primarily from satellite imagery and data. The project aims to coordinate delivery of these information products direct to users. Services include enhanced sea ice information (charts and forecasts) as well as ice-edge and iceberg monitoring data. We also provide monitoring services for lake and river ice, snow cover maps and glacier monitoring and assessment. any services are delivered in near real time and are readily accessible via the Internet.

  • Measurements of mean annual temperature in degrees Celsius at 22 sites in Pine Island Glacier, located by hand held Garmin GPS position, and altitude recorded by survey quality Leica GPS. The mean annual temperature of a remote ice sheet site is generally agreed to be equivalent to the temperature measured at 10m depth in a borehole. This dataset records the 10m temperatures at 22 remote sites in the Pine Island Glacier region of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. Data were recorded on a single thermistor logging thermometer for a period of 12 to 24 hours on the date noted in table (marked in table as ''Single thermistor'') or as the mean of two cables with parallel triple thermistors measured at a single time (date/time noted in table) after a minimum of 12 hours settling in the borehole (marked in table as ''Average of six thermistors''). Measurements were made independently in two boreholes: one drilled to approximately 12m for deployment of a neutron source ice density probe (marked in table as ''10m temperature neutron probe borehole''); one drilled to approximately 50m during recovery of an ice core (marked in table as ''10m temperature ice core borehole''). Some have argued that the mean annual temperature is better measured at 15m in a borehole to remove any trace of the seasonal surface temperature cycle. In the table we additionally record the temperature in the ice core borehole at 15m (marked in table as ''15m temperature ice core borehole'') using a logging PT-100 temperature device (marked in table as ''Single PT-100'').

  • A record of subaerial calving activity at a lacustrine margin of Russell Glacier, west Greenland, comprising 290 calving events classified by volume, area and calving mechanism. Data were acquired continuously from July 2014 to September 2015 using an array of time-lapse cameras. Imagery from the cameras was employed to generate a time-series of ice-margin point clouds, which were then differenced to determine calving properties. The dataset is designed to facilitate the analysis of seasonality in lacustrine calving processes. Supplementary point clouds were also generated to investigate the effects of two lake drainage events on calving processes in the summers of 2014 and 2015. Point cloud parameters and a record of lake stage are also included. The dataset was collected and processed by researchers in the School of Geography at the University of Leeds. Funding was provided by Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors Research Trust (project number 474), The Mount Everest Foundation, The Gilchrist Educational Trust, and Sigma Xi.

  • Datasets from the Resolving subglacial properties, hydrological networks and dynamic evolution of ice flow on the Greenland Ice Sheet (RESPONDER) project as published in the paper by Chudley et al. entitled "Supraglacial lake drainage at a fast-flowing Greenlandic outlet glacier". Please cite this paper if using this data. This dataset consists of observations of the rapid drainage of a supraglacial lake on Store Glacier, a marine-terminating outlet glacier of the west Greenland Ice Sheet. ''Lake 028'', located 70.57degN, 50.08degW, drained on 2018-07-07 and was recorded using a variety of geophysical instrumentation. The dataset presented here includes all data necessary to replicate the findings presented in the main paper, including UAV photogrammetry-derived raster data (producing a series of orthophotos, digital elevation models, and velocity fields) and time-series records from in-situ geophysical instrumentation (GPS receiver, geophone, and water pressure sensor). Funding was provided by NERC DTP grant NE/L002507/1 and ERC Horizon 2020 grant 683043.

  • Airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) measurements of surface elevation, bed topography and ice thickness were made across the Bailey/Slessor region of East Antarctica. The primary objective of this research was to investigate the newly discovered complex flow in a region of the interior of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. To do this, the surface, englacial and basal flow regime of a region of complex flow associated with the upper part of the Bailey/Slessor glacier system was investigated using 150 MHz airborne radio-echo sounding (RES) equipment mounted on the airborne survey Twin Otter aircraft. The effective along track sampling interval = 25 m and across track spacing = 40 km.

  • Measurement of temperature at the base of a 20-m deep borehole in the region of subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Resistance of two calibrated thermistors measured at the base of a 20-m deep borehole.

  • In 2014 polarimetric phase sensitive radar data were collected at Korff Ice Rise, West Antarctica, with the aim of studying fabric within the ice column and ice bed properties. Data were collected at sites within 700m of one another along the axis of the ice divide. The radar data were collected by rotating the antenna through 180 deg to allow reconstruction of the azimuthal variation in power and phase. This study is part of the British Antarctic Survey programme Polar Science for Planet Earth. All data were collected with the support of the British Antarctic Survey. The ApRES fieldwork were funded by Natural Environmental Research Council grant NE/J008087/1, led by Richard Hindmarsh.

  • In 2015 long offset seismic gathers were collected at Korff Ice Rise, West Antarctica, with the aim of studying fabric within the ice column and ice bed properties. Data were collected at sites within 700m of one another along the axis of the ice divide. The seismic gathers were collected at 60 deg intervals to study azimuthal variation in seismic velocity and shear wave splitting. This study is part of the British Antarctic Survey programme Polar Science for Planet Earth. All data were collected with the support of the British Antarctic Survey.

  • This dataset provides the data produced as part of the work published in: Leeson, A. A., Foster, E., Rice, A., Gourmelen, N. and van Wessem, J. M.. 2019. ''Evolution of supraglacial lakes on the Larsen B ice shelf in the decades before it collapsed'' Geophysical Research Letters. It includes 1) shapefiles of supraglacial lakes mapped in both optical (Landsat) and SAR (ERS) satellite imagery, 2) rasters of lake depth, derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ images acquired in 1988 and 2000 and 3) shapefiles of the study area considered in the paper. Funding was provided by ERPSRC grant EP/R01860X/1.

  • This dataset provides supraglacial lake extents as published in the paper by Arthur et al. (2020) entitled "Distribution and seasonal evolution of supraglacial lakes on Shackleton Ice Shelf, East Antarctica". Please cite this paper if using this data. This dataset consists of (1) shapefiles of supraglacial lake extents on Shackleton Ice Shelf, in Queen Mary Land, East Antarctica (65 degS; 100 degE) derived from optical satellite imagery (Landsat-1, -4, -5, -7, -8, Sentinel 2) acquired between 1974 and 2020 and (2) rasters of supraglacial lake depths derived from optical satellite imagery (Landsat-1, -4, -5, -7, -8, Sentinel 2) acquired between 2000 and 2020. The datasets presented here were used to analyse the spatial distribution of lakes, lake densities, elevation, slope and ice surface velocity distributions, proximity to exposed bedrock, blue ice and the grounding line, and time series of lake area, depth and volume. Funding was provided by NERC DTP grant NE/L002590/1 and NERC grant NE/R000824/1.