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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Topography/Ice Sheet Topography

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  • This gridded dataset provides geometry (ice thickness and bedrock topography) covering the Pine Island Glacier catchment. It has been created using the principle of mass conservation, given observed fields of velocity, surface elevation change and surface mass balance, together with sparse ice thickness data measured along airborne radar flight-lines. Previous ice flow modelling studies show that gridded geometry products that use traditional interpolation techniques (e.g. Bedmap2) can result in a spurious thickening tendency near the grounding line of Pine Island Glacier. Removing the cause of this thickening signal, in order to more accurately model ice flow dynamics, has been the motivation for creating a new geometry that is consistent with the conservation of mass. This data was funded by a PhD project within the iSTAR-C programme (with NERC grant reference NE/J005738/1).

  • Survey flying (using Basler BT-67 aircraft C-GJKB) was carried out between 1 May 2014 and 12 May 2014 to measure the ice thickness, surface elevation and magnetic anomaly of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Nunavut, Canada. The primary radar instrument was the UTIG-JPL High-Capability Radar Sounder (HICARS: Peters et al., 2005). Level 1 radar data products are hosted at NSIDC. Surface elevation data was acquired by a fixed beam Riegl laser altimeter using a solid-state infrared lasar firing at 100 Hz. A tail boom-mounted cesium vapor total field magnetometer specially configured for the aircraft measured the magnetic anomaly. Funding was provided by NERC grants NE/K004999/1, NE/K004956/1 and NE/K004956/2.

  • The dataset encompasses the processed point clouds (.pts format), a panoramic tour, and a video flythrough of registered point clouds capturing a 273 m long reach of the englacial portal channel in the glacier, Austre Broggerbreen, Svalbard, in March 2017. Point clouds were derived from 27 Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys, to characterise the morphology of the channel in three-dimensions and enable extraction of features reflective of hydrological flow conditions. The panoramic tour shows a greyscale image of the scan reflectivity values at each survey location, whereby the lighter the pixel colour, the greater the intensity of the laser beam return. This panoramic tour enables the viewer to self-navigate through the channel to see the morphological features within it. The video flythrough of the point cloud provides a visualisation of the point cloud data, travelling from the portal exit to the extent of the scanned reach. The point cloud has been coloured to reflect differences in height above the portal exit. Funding source Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarship (KESS II) under Project AU10003, a pan-Wales higher-level skills initiative led by Bangor University of behalf of the HE sector in Wales. It is part funded by the Welsh Government''s European Social Fund (ESF) convergence programme for West Wales and the Valleys. Funding was awarded to TDLI-F and JEK, with support from Deri Jones & Associates Ltd. Additional support is acknowledged from Aberystwyth University (Department of Geography and Earth Sciences).

  • The dataset encompasses the processed point clouds (.pts format), a panoramic tour, and a video flythrough of registered point clouds capturing a 122 m long reach of an englacial cut-and-closure channel in the glacier, Austre Broggerbreen, Svalbard, in March 2016. Point clouds were derived from 28 Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) surveys, to characterise the morphology of the channel in three-dimensions and enable extraction of features reflective of hydrological flow conditions. The panoramic tour shows a greyscale image of the scan reflectivity values at each survey location, whereby the lighter the pixel colour, the greater the intensity of the laser beam return. This panoramic tour enables the viewer to self-navigate through the channel to see the morphological features within it. The video flythrough of the point cloud provides a visualisation of the point cloud data, travelling from the glacier surface, down the moulin and along the extent of the scanned reach. The point cloud has been coloured to reflect differences in height. Funding source Knowledge Economy Skills Scholarship (KESS II) under Project AU10003, a pan-Wales higher-level skills initiative led by Bangor University of behalf of the HE sector in Wales. It is part funded by the Welsh Government''s European Social Fund (ESF) convergence programme for West Wales and the Valleys. Funding was awarded to TDLI-F and JEK, with support from Deri Jones & Associates Ltd. Additional support is acknowledged from Aberystwyth University (Department of Geography and Earth Sciences).

  • Radio-echo sounding (RES) data was collected between 4 and 11 December 2012, using the British Antarctic Survey Deep-Look Radio-Echo Sounder (DELORES). From this dataset a digital elevation model (DEM) for Starbuck Glacier was created. The data consists of grids relating to ice-thickness and bedrock elevation for the glacier as well as the RES data.

  • A new subglacial bed Digital Elevation Model (DEM) from Ellsworth Subglacial Highlands (ESH) was created from previously gridded bed elevation data and new unpublished radar data. The new DEM includes the upper reaches of Pine Island Glacier, Rutford and Institute Ice Streams and reveals new topographical features. The main findings on this new DEM are two linear deep throughs with a perpendicular transection valley near Subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Additionally, using the new DEM and ice surface elevation data from CryoSat2 ice surface DEM, a hydropotential model was built and used to create a detailed hydropotential model of ESH to simulate the subglacial hydrological network. This approach allowed us to characterize basal hydrology, subglacial water catchments and connections between them. In this characterization we noticed the mismatch between subglacial hydrological catchment and ice surfaces catchment of Rutford Ice Stream, Pine Island Glacier and Thwaites Glacier. Funding was provided by NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI) grants NE/D008751/1, NE/D009200/1, and NE/D008638/1, and NERC grant NE/G013071/1.

  • The dataset presented here contains a csv-file including the coordinates, received power of the bed reflection and the two-way travel time of the bed reflection. The X and Y coordinates are projected in EPSG:3031 - WGS 84 / Antarctic Polar Stereographic coordinate system. Data presented here have been frequency filtered and 2D migrated (using a finite difference approach and migration velocity of 0.168 m ns-1), followed by the picking of the bed reflection using ReflexW software (Sandmeier Scientific Software). The received power is calculated within a 280 ns time window centred on, and encompassing, the bed reflection (Gades et al., 2000). This work was funded within the BEAMISH project by NERC AFI award numbers NE/G014159/1 and NE/G013187/1.

  • Radio-echo sounding data was collected using 150 MHz ice-penetrating radars with bandwidths of 15-20 MHz. This data was collected as part of the seven nation Antarctica''s Gamburtsev Province (AGAP) expedition during the International Polar Year 2007-2009, and used to acquire a detailed image of the ice sheet bed deep in the interior of East Antarctica. Airborne geophysical methods were used to understand the fundamental structure shrouded beneath Dome A. Two twin Otter aircraft - one BAS, one United States Antarctic Program (USAP) - equipped with ice-sounding radars, laser ranging systems, gravity meters and magnetomemeters, operated from camps located on either side of Dome A.

  • Datasets from the Resolving subglacial properties, hydrological networks and dynamic evolution of ice flow on the Greenland Ice Sheet (RESPONDER) project as published in the paper by Chudley et al. entitled "Supraglacial lake drainage at a fast-flowing Greenlandic outlet glacier". Please cite this paper if using this data. This dataset consists of observations of the rapid drainage of a supraglacial lake on Store Glacier, a marine-terminating outlet glacier of the west Greenland Ice Sheet. ''Lake 028'', located 70.57degN, 50.08degW, drained on 2018-07-07 and was recorded using a variety of geophysical instrumentation. The dataset presented here includes all data necessary to replicate the findings presented in the main paper, including UAV photogrammetry-derived raster data (producing a series of orthophotos, digital elevation models, and velocity fields) and time-series records from in-situ geophysical instrumentation (GPS receiver, geophone, and water pressure sensor). Funding was provided by NERC DTP grant NE/L002507/1 and ERC Horizon 2020 grant 683043.

  • Geographical Positioning System (GPS) data recorded in the region of subglacial Lake Ellsworth. Recording instruments: Leica geodetic receivers. Static data: Two locations with continuous data records; all other locations (~70) occupied for short periods (mostly <1 hour). Roving data: Moving GPS data acquired during radio-echo sounding (DELORES) surveys. Variable in length. Up to ~8 hours of data acquisition.