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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Thickness/Ice Sheet Thickness

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  • Model output from a series of idealised ice shelf-ocean simulations, demonstrating a new synchronously coupled modelling method as well as the response of ice shelf buttressing to melt under various temperature forcings.

  • The dataset lists information about boreholes drilled by hot water into Khumbu Glacier, Nepal. Boreholes were drilled in May 2017 and May 2018 to investigate the internal properties of Khumbu Glacier, specifically ice thickness, temperature, deformation and structure, as part of the NERC-funded ''EverDrill'' research project. The information provided includes each borehole''s ID, length, location (at the time of drilling), elevation and instrumentation. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/P00265X/1 and NE/P002021/1.

  • During the austral summer of 2004/05 a collaborative US/UK field campaign undertook a systematic geophysical survey of the entire Amundsen Sea embayment using comparable airborne survey systems mounted in Twin Otter aircraft. Here we present the portion of the survey covering the Pine Island Glacier basin led by British Antarctic Survey. Operating from a temporary field camp (PNE, S 77deg34'' W 095deg56''); we collected ~35,000 km of airborne survey data. Our aircraft was equipped with dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS for navigation, radar altimeter for surface mapping, wing-tip magnetometers, gravity meter, and a new ice-sounding radar system (PASIN). We present here the bed elevation picks from airborne radar depth sounding collected using the BAS PASIN radar depth sounding system. Data are provided as XYZ ASCII line data.

  • The data set was produced for the work detailed in ''The response of ice sheets to climate variability'' by K Snow et al (2017, Geophys Research Letters). A coupled ice sheet-ocean model is configured in an idealised setting with an inland-deepening bedrock, forced by far-field hydrographic profiles representative of the Amundsen Sea continental shelf. Similar to observed variability, the thermocline depth in the far-field is moved up and down on various times scales as detailed in the publication, with periods ranging from 2 to ~50 years. Bedrock elevation is provided, and annual melt rate and ice thickness (or sub-annual for short time scales) is provided as well for each forcing period. In addition, similar experiments were carried out with an ice-only model with parameterised forcing. These outputs are provided too.

  • The dataset lists information about the instrumentation of boreholes drilled into Khumbu Glacier, Nepal. Boreholes were drilled in May 2017 and May 2018 to investigate the internal properties of Khumbu Glacier, specifically ice thickness, temperature, deformation and structure, as part of the NERC-funded ''EverDrill'' research project. The information provided includes each borehole''s ID, length, location, elevation and instrumentation, including the type and depth of each sensor. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/P00265X/1 and NE/P002021/1.

  • This gridded dataset provides geometry (ice thickness and bedrock topography) covering the Pine Island Glacier catchment. It has been created using the principle of mass conservation, given observed fields of velocity, surface elevation change and surface mass balance, together with sparse ice thickness data measured along airborne radar flight-lines. Previous ice flow modelling studies show that gridded geometry products that use traditional interpolation techniques (e.g. Bedmap2) can result in a spurious thickening tendency near the grounding line of Pine Island Glacier. Removing the cause of this thickening signal, in order to more accurately model ice flow dynamics, has been the motivation for creating a new geometry that is consistent with the conservation of mass. This data was funded by a PhD project within the iSTAR-C programme (with NERC grant reference NE/J005738/1).

  • Survey flying (using Basler BT-67 aircraft C-GJKB) was carried out between 1 May 2014 and 12 May 2014 to measure the ice thickness, surface elevation and magnetic anomaly of the Queen Elizabeth Islands, Nunavut, Canada. The primary radar instrument was the UTIG-JPL High-Capability Radar Sounder (HICARS: Peters et al., 2005). Level 1 radar data products are hosted at NSIDC. Surface elevation data was acquired by a fixed beam Riegl laser altimeter using a solid-state infrared lasar firing at 100 Hz. A tail boom-mounted cesium vapor total field magnetometer specially configured for the aircraft measured the magnetic anomaly. Funding was provided by NERC grants NE/K004999/1, NE/K004956/1 and NE/K004956/2.

  • Radio-echo sounding (RES) data was collected between 4 and 11 December 2012, using the British Antarctic Survey Deep-Look Radio-Echo Sounder (DELORES). From this dataset a digital elevation model (DEM) for Starbuck Glacier was created. The data consists of grids relating to ice-thickness and bedrock elevation for the glacier as well as the RES data.

  • This data are derived from single point seismic data collected across the Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf. The seismic data were collected over the course of three seasons by a number of field parties, consisting of two main surveys between the 15/16 and 16/17 austral summers and several smaller surveys, as part of a joint initiative between the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and the Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) in the framework of the "Filchner Ice Shelf System" (FISS) and the "Filchner Ice Shelf Project" (FISP). A total of 256 point seismic measurements were made, of which 248 had clearly visible reflectors and were deemed usable. Each data point consists of a location, together with measurements of ice thickness and water column thickness. These data were collected as part of the FISS NERC large grant, project number NE/L013770/1.

  • Radio-echo sounding data was collected using 150 MHz ice-penetrating radars with bandwidths of 15-20 MHz. This data was collected as part of the seven nation Antarctica''s Gamburtsev Province (AGAP) expedition during the International Polar Year 2007-2009, and used to acquire a detailed image of the ice sheet bed deep in the interior of East Antarctica. Airborne geophysical methods were used to understand the fundamental structure shrouded beneath Dome A. Two twin Otter aircraft - one BAS, one United States Antarctic Program (USAP) - equipped with ice-sounding radars, laser ranging systems, gravity meters and magnetomemeters, operated from camps located on either side of Dome A.