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EARTH SCIENCE > Cryosphere > Glaciers/Ice Sheets > Glacier Motion/Ice Sheet Motion

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  • The data set contains values of basal slipperiness (C) and the rate factor (A) for the whole of the Antarctic Ice Sheet. The slipperiness was estimated through model inversion from measurements of surface velocities (1) and ice thickness (2) using the ice-flow model Ua (3). The ice was assumed to deform according to Glen''s flow law with a stress exponent n=3. Basal sliding was assumed to follow Weertman sliding law with m=3, with u_b = C tau^m, where u_b is the basal sliding velocity and tau the (tangential) basal traction.

  • Surface speeds for a point close to the front of Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier based on satellite image feature tracking from 1985 to 2018. Funding: The data have been collected over many years. Most recent project funding is NERC project CALISMO NE/P011365/1.

  • Ice front positions for Kangerdlugssuaq Glacier, Greenland, based on digitisation of satellite images between 1985 to 2018. Funding: The data have been collected over many years. Most recent project funding is NERC project CALISMO NE/P011365/1.

  • From May 2009 to May 2013, seven dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed along a 120 km-long transect in the south-west of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Two additional dual-frequency GPS receivers were deployed perpendicular to longitudinal ice flow at ~14 km inland: one 5 km distant from June 2011 to May 2013, and another 2.5 km distance from May 2012 to May 2013. Each receiver recorded position observations every 10 seconds or 30 seconds (depending on configuration), enabling resolution of horizontal and vertical ice motion. Sites were powered by solar panels and operated 24 hours a day during summer but shut down in the autumn. Absolute ice displacements at each site were obtained for each summer and winter period in the absence of continuous measurements. Position measurements were kinematically corrected relative to an off-ice base station using TRACK (Chen, 1999). Daily velocities were then obtained by differencing across 24-hour periods, whilst continuous velocities were obtained through application of a sliding 6-hour differencing window. At each GPS site we also measured (1) the near-surface air temperature every 15 minutes year-round, (2) net seasonal ablation using ablation stakes, and (3) at several selected sites melt rates using sonic ranging sensors. This version 2 of the dataset updates the previously 2-day temporal resolution of the ice motion records to 1-day resolution. In other respects the dataset has not changed. Funded by NERC, the Carnegie Trust for the Universities of Scotland and The University of Edinburgh. Relevant grants: NE/F021399/1, NE/H024964/1 Studentships: NE/I52830X/1, NE/J500021/1, NE/H526794/1

  • The datasets are ice tilt time series from strings of accelerometers, each located at a discrete depth within one of three boreholes into Khumbu Glacier, Nepal. Ice deformation can be derived from this tilt data, but has not yet been calculated. Boreholes were drilled in May 2017 and 2018 to investigate the internal properties of Khumbu Glacier, specifically ice thickness, temperature, deformation and structure, as part of the NERC-funded ''EverDrill'' research project. Supporting borehole information is provided as a related dataset. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/P00265X/1 and NE/P002021/1.

  • Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data acquired during the RABID project in the 2004-2005 field season. A Mala RAMAC GPR system was used, with 200, 100 and 50 MHz unshielded antennas. The 100 MHz antennas could be used in cross-polarised and both in-line and cross-line configuration in a single survey, via a multiplexer. GPR profiles were acquired over all the seismic reflection lines, ~40km upstream from the grounding line of Rutford Ice Stream. The Tyree04 line was orientated across the ice stream, Mogensen, Tolly and Rabid were in line with the ice flow. In addition, the cross-stream line was extended 3.6 km towards the mountains and 3.6 km towards Fletcher Promontory. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Sections of ice core acquired from upper 100 m of the Rutford Ice Stream during the RABID project. Sections of ice core, up to 4m long and 95mm diameter, were drilled and retrieved using the hot-water ice-corer. The cores were taken from specific depths above, below or straddling the radar reflecting layers in two adjacent holes. A total of 6 cores were collected, with a total of 21.04m of ice. The cores were logged, cut into 55cm sections, sealed in lay-flat plastic tubing, packed in foam and placed in insulated core boxes. The ice was returned to the UK and will be analysed for physical and dielectric properties. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Digital time series data collected with an instrument string for monitoring of drilling during the RABID project. Each instrument string consisted of a 2.5km, five-core cable with twelve instrument units mounted along its length. Each unit measured water temperature, pressure, flow, drill depth and hose tension, and was collected at the drilling site ~40km upstream from the grounding line of Rutford Ice Stream. Primary data recorded on Campbell CR10X data. All sensors on all instruments were logged every 15 minutes. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Dataset comprises approximately 1MB of ice temperature data acquired during the RABID project on Rutford Ice Stream. Data was collected between November 2004 and February 2006, using a thermistor string. The thermistor cable had ten 3K3A Betatherm thermistors located at depths between 15m and 300m below the surface, at approximately 31.5m intervals. The thermistors were calibrated prior to the field work in stable air temperatures at -28 degrees Celsius and +19 degrees Celsius and in an ice point bath. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).

  • Digital seismic reflection data collected during the RABID project in the 2004-2005 field season, using a BISON 9024 seismograph. The seismic survey was carried out ~40km upstream from the grounding line of Rutford Ice Stream, and repeated relevant sections of a 1991 and 1997 survey. Data was collected using 24 channels arranged at 10m spacing. The survey geometry produced four single fold lines with 5 m reflection-point spacing at the bed. The first seismic line (Tyree04 Line) was orientated across the ice stream, the other three (Mogensen Line, Tolly Line and Rabid Line) were in line with the ice flow and intersected the first line at different locations. The RABID project employed hot-water drilling techniques, down-hole instrumentation, as well as surface geophysical measurements, to form an integrated programme studying ice dynamics, basal conditions, climate and glacial history. Funding was provided by the UK NERC Antarctic Funding Initiative (AFI).