nonCciKeyword

Drought

14 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 14
  • This dataset provides 100 model realisations of daily river flow in cubic metres per second (m3/s) for 1,366 catchments, for the period 1962 to 2015. The dataset is model output from the DECIPHeR hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and CHESS-PE potential evapotranspiration). The modelled catchments correspond to locations of National River Flow Archive (NRFA) gauging stations and provide good spatial coverage across the UK. The dataset was produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity) to provide national scale probabilistic flow simulations and predictions for UK drought risk analysis. MaRIUS was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d770b12a-3824-4e40-8da1-930cf9470858

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and Oudin temperature-based potential evaporation). It provides daily mean river flow (m3/s) for 260 catchments, for the period 1891 to 2015. The catchments correspond to locations of NRFA gauging stations (http://nrfa.ceh.ac.uk/). The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity (http://www.mariusdroughtproject.org/). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0ceb4f85-0bbf-49f0-ab70-cfc137ab7d4d

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and MORECS potential evaporation). It provides daily mean river flow (m3/s) for 260 catchments, for the period 1960 to 2015. The catchments correspond to locations of NRFA gauging stations (http://nrfa.ceh.ac.uk/). The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity (http://www.mariusdroughtproject.org/). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5f3c1a02-d5c4-4faa-9353-e8b68ce2ace2

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by weather@home2 climate model data. It provides a 100-member ensemble of monthly mean flow (m3/s) and soil moisture (mm water/m soil) on a 1 km grid for the following time periods: historical baseline (HISTBS: 1900-2006), near-future (NF: 2020-2049) and far-future (FF: 2070-2099). It also includes a baseline period (BS: 1975-2004). To aid interpretation, two additional spatial datasets are provided: - Digitally-derived catchment areas on a 1km x 1km grid - Estimated locations of flow gauging stations on a 1km x 1km grid and as a csv file. The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3b90962e-6fc8-4251-853e-b9683e37f790

  • Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) data for Integrated Hydrological Units (IHU) Hydrometric Areas (Kral et al., 2015; https://doi.org/10.5285/3a4e94fc-4c68-47eb-a217-adee2a6b02b3). SPI is a drought index based on the probability of precipitation for a given accumulation period as defined by McKee et al. [1]. SPI is calculated for different accumulation periods: 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24 months. Each of these is in turn calculated for each of the twelve calendar months. Note that values in monthly (and for longer accumulation periods also annual) time series of the data therefore are likely to be autocorrelated. The standard period which was used to fit the gamma distribution is 1961-2010. The dataset covers the period from 1862 to 2015. NOTE: the difference between this dataset with the previously published dataset 'Standardised Precipitation Index time series for IHU hydrometric areas (1961-2012)' [SPI_IHU_HA] (Tanguy et al., 2015; https://doi.org/10.5285/5e1792a0-ae95-4e77-bccd-2fb456112cc1), apart from the temporal extent, is the underlying rainfall data from which SPI was calculated. In the previously published dataset, CEH-GEAR (Tanguy et al., 2014; https://doi.org/10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e) was used, whereas in this new version, Met Office 5km rainfall grids were used (see supporting documentation for more details). Within Historic Droughts project (grant number: NE/L01016X/1), the Met Office has digitised historic rainfall and temperature data to produce high quality historic rainfall and temperature grids, which motivated the change in the underlying data to calculate SPI. The methodology to calculate SPI is the same in the two datasets. This release supersedes the previous version, https://doi.org/10.5285/d8655cc9-b275-4e77-9e6c-1b16eee5c7d5, as it addresses localised issues with the source data (Met Office monthly rainfall grids) for the period 1960 to 2000. [1] McKee, T. B., Doesken, N. J., Kleist, J. (1993). The Relationship of Drought Frequency and Duration to Time Scales. Eighth Conference on Applied Climatology, 17-22 January 1993, Anaheim, California. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a754cae2-d6a4-456e-b367-e99891d7920f

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and MORECS potential evaporation). It provides monthly mean flow (m3/s) and soil moisture (mm water/m soil) on a 1 km grid for the period 1960 to 2015. To aid interpretation, two additional spatial datasets are provided: * Digitally-derived catchment areas on a 1km x 1km grid * Estimated locations of flow gauging stations on a 1km x 1km grid and as a csv file. The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e911196a-b371-47b1-968c-661eb600d83b

  • 5km gridded Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) data for Great Britain, which is a drought index based on the probability of precipitation for a given accumulation period as defined by McKee et al [1]. There are seven accumulation periods: 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24 months and for each period SPI is calculated for each of the twelve calendar months. Note that values in monthly (and for longer accumulation periods also annual) time series of the data therefore are likely to be autocorrelated. The standard period which was used to fit the gamma distribution is 1961-2010. The dataset covers the period from 1862 to 2015. This version supersedes previous versions (version 2 and 3) of the same dataset due to minor errors in the data files. NOTE: the difference between this dataset with the previously published dataset "Gridded Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) using gamma distribution with standard period 1961-2010 for Great Britain [SPIgamma61-10]" (Tanguy et al., 2015; https://doi.org/10.5285/94c9eaa3-a178-4de4-8905-dbfab03b69a0) , apart from the temporal and spatial extent, is the underlying rainfall data from which SPI was calculated. In the previously published dataset, CEH-GEAR (Tanguy et al., 2014; https://doi.org/10.5285/5dc179dc-f692-49ba-9326-a6893a503f6e) was used, whereas in this new version, Met Office 5km rainfall grids were used (see supporting information for more details). The methodology to calculate SPI is the same in the two datasets. [1] McKee, T. B., Doesken, N. J., Kleist, J. (1993). The Relationship of Drought Frequency and Duration to Time Scales. Eighth Conference on Applied Climatology, 17-22 January 1993, Anaheim, California. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/233090b2-1d14-4eb9-9f9c-3923ea2350ff

  • This dataset contains the Standardised Streamflow Index (SSI) data for 303 catchments across the United Kingdom from 1891 to 2015. The SSI is a drought index based on the cumulative probability of a given monthly mean streamflow occurring for a given catchment. Here, the SSI is calculated for the following accumulation periods: 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months. Each accumulation period is calculated for calendar end-months. The standard period used to fit the Tweedie distribution is 1961-2010. The SSI was produced by the RCUK-funded Historic Droughts project in order to characterise and explore hydrological drought severity over the period 1891-2015. This dataset is an outcome of the Historic Droughts Project (grant number: NE/L01016X/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/58ef13a9-539f-46e5-88ad-c89274191ff9

  • This dataset contains root length, biomass and fungal colonisation data for Calluna vulgaris from control, drought and warming treated soils from the long term climate change experiment in Clocaenog forest. Soil samples were collected from the climate change experiment in Northeast Wales during April 2015. Roots were separated from the soil, their length and biomass measured and then analysed using microscopy for Ericoid mycorrhizae (ErM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonisation of Calluna vulgaris. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots, three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants growing season (March to September). The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes and has been running since 1999. The root length and fungal colonisation data aims to understand how changes in soil hydrological and chemical properties have influenced Calluna vulgaris rooting behaviour and interactions with the soil microbiome. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3d468857-f5d0-4dc4-88f3-6be6df19608b

  • This dataset is a model output, from the Grid-to-Grid hydrological model driven by observed climate data (CEH-GEAR rainfall and Oudin temperature-based potential evaporation). It provides monthly mean flow (m3/s) and soil moisture (mm water/m soil) on a 1 km grid for the period 1891 to 2015. To aid interpretation, two additional spatial datasets are provided: - Digitally-derived catchment areas on a 1km x 1km grid - Estimated locations of flow gauging stations on a 1km x 1km grid and as a csv file. The data were produced as part of MaRIUS (Managing the Risks, Impacts and Uncertainties of drought and water Scarcity), which was a UK NERC-funded research project (2014-2017) that developed a risk-based approach to drought and water scarcity (http://www.mariusdroughtproject.org/). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f52f012d-9f2e-42cc-b628-9cdea4fa3ba0