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  • This dataset contains a variety of hydrographic measurements including temperature, salinity, sound velocity, current speed/ direction and seismic data. Hydrographic profilers provided measurements of temperature, salinity, sound velocity and density. Four mooring stations were also installed as part of this project, with three minilogger chains providing temperature data and four moored ADCPs measuring current veloicty. The project ran from February 2006 to September 2009, however all of the data were collected between 17 April 2007 and 14 May 2007 during two cruises which took place in the Gulf of Cadiz. The research was conducted using two research vessels, the RRS Discovery (cruise D318) and the RV Poseidon (cruise PO350). The RRS Discovery cruise D318 was split into two legs, D318a, which took place between 17 April 2007 and 23 April 2007 and D318b, which took place between 29 April 2007 and 14 May 2007. For the second leg of cruise D318, the RRS Discovery was joined by the RV Poseidon. Hydrographic measurements were taken using a variety of instruments, including expendable bathythermographs (XBT), expendable CTDs (XCTD), conductivity-temperature depth (CTD) profilers, acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP) and VEMCO minilogger chains. Airguns and streamers were used in the recording of the seismic data. The main objectives of the Geophysical Oceanography (GO) project were A) To evaluate and improve new research methods in the developing field of seismic oceanography by exploiting the opportunity of two-ship operations between RSS Discovery and RV Poseidon and B) To study the internal wave field and mixing processes in the Gulf of Cadiz and demonstrate quantitative links between seismic and oceanographic measurements. The cruise was coordinated by Durham Univerity and funded under an EU grant as part of the Framework 6 NEST programme. Eight scientific institutions were involved in the project. These were: the University of Durham, the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL), the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (IFM-GEOMAR), the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER), the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, the Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), the University of Western Brittany and the University of Lisbon. Data from the programme are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • The dataset comprises 1 hydrographic data profile, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the Inner Seas off the West Coast of Scotland area specifically Loch Shieldaig during August 2006. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory.

  • The dataset comprises 122 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, made in the NE Atlantic specifically NE of Penmarc' h Canyon, during July 1998. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency Winfrith.

  • The dataset comprises 86 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically in the upwelling off the NW African Coast, from January to March of 1985. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Institute for Marine Science, Kiel.

  • The RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS dataset comprises measurements of current velocity, temperature, salinity and pressure. Oceanic volume transports are calculated from these variables resulting in continuous measurements of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC). Data collection is obtained from a mooring array across 26.5N in the Atlantic Ocean and cable measurements across the Florida Straits. The measurement array extends from the Bahamas to the African coast. The data have been measured continuously between April 2004 and September 2018. The data are collected periodically (currently every 18 months) from various UK and USA research cruises. Measurements between the Bahamas and Africa were made using a variety of MicroCat CTD sensors, various current meters and ADCP. All instruments are located on 18 moorings in various locations at 26.5N. An undersea cable makes current velocity measurements across the Florida Straits. The RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS programme aims to deliver a multi-decadal time series of observations of AMOC. The observations will be used with data from other sources to determine and interpret recent changes in the AMOC, to assess the risk of rapid climate change due to changes in the MOC, and to investigate the potential for predicting the MOC and its impacts on climate. The RAPID-MOCHA-WBTS programme is a joint effort between NERC in the UK (the UK Principal Investigator is David Smeed), NOAA (Molly Baringer) and RSMAS (Prof. Bill Johns) in the USA. The Atlantic MOC transport (and its components), calculated from the above data, and gridded files of temperature and salinity are held by BODC in NetCDF format.

  • The dataset comprises 56 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North Sea area including specifically along a transect offshore of Stonehaven, during May and June of 2001. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory.

  • The 26 North dataset comprises moored temperature, conductivity and salinity, current velocity, acoustic travel time and bottom pressure time series. Data have been collected in the North Atlantic between latitudes of 23.7 degrees N and 28 degrees N in three sub -arrays at the Western Boundary (76.9 degrees W to 69.4 degrees W), Mid-Atlantic Ridge (52.1 degrees W to 40.9 degrees W) and Eastern Boundary (24.2 degrees W to 12.2 degrees W ). A number of instrumented moorings, some of which are full depth, have been deployed in each sub-array. Data have been collected since February 2004 and the moorings have been turned around every year. Data have been collected using a variety of moored instrumentation including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensors, current meters, Bottom Pressure Recorders (BPR), Inverted Echo Sounders (IES) and Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). Data are collected in order to calculate and continuously monitor the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC) and provide a long term time series of the strength of the MOC. The 26 North dataset comprises moored data collected by the RAPID: monitoring the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation at 26.5 degrees N since 2004 (RAPIDMOC) project and the Meridional Overturning Circulation and Heat-flux Array (MOCHA) project. Data are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • The dataset comprises 65 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North Sea area specifically along a transect offshore of Stonehaven and across the Wee Bankie/Marr Bank study area. The data were collected during March of 2001. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory.

  • The dataset comprises 34 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from the West Inner Seas off the West Coast of Scotland and the North East Atlantic Ocean area specifically East of Barra Fan, taken during September 1995. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Defence Evaluation and Research Agency Winfrith as part of the Shelf Edge Studies Acoustic Measurement Experiment (SESAME).

  • The data set comprises a series of ten reports containing tables of current data and diagrams of trajectories derived from neutrally buoyant floats deployed in seas across the globe. The floats were numbered between 1-180 and 209-227, with floats 1-180 being deployed between 1955 and 1964 and floats 209-227 being deployed between February and March 1969. Detailed deployment information is listed below, with deployment location, float numbers, deployment dates and ship name (if known). NE Atlantic: floats 1-5 (Jun 1955, Oct-Nov 1955); float 11 (Aug 1956); floats 12-20 (Mar 1957); floats 25-33 (May-Jul 1958); floats 34-39 (Nov 1958). Norwegian Sea: floats 6-10 (Apr-May 1956). NW Pacific: floats 21-24 (Jul-Aug 1957). Deep water off Bermuda: floats 40-53, 55, 58 (Jun-Oct 1959, RV Aries); floats 54, 56, 57 (Oct 1959, RV Crawford); floats 59-60,64-65,68, 69,71,73-74 (Jun-Dec 1959, RV Aries); floats 61-63,66, 67,70,72 (Nov 1959, RV Crawford); floats 75-77 (Dec 1959, RV Atlantis); floats 78-98 (Feb-Jun 1960, RV Aries); floats 99-119 (Jun-Aug 1960, RV Aries). Faroe-Shetland Channel: floats 120-127 (Jul 1961, RRS Discovery). Faroe Bank Channel: float 135 (1963, Ernest Holt). Labrador Sea: floats 128-132 (1962, Erika Dan). Arabian Sea: floats 133, 134, 136-139 (Jul-Aug 1963, RRS Discovery). Indian Ocean: floats 140-160 (Mar-Apr 1964, RRS Discovery); floats 161-180 (Apr-Aug 1964, RRS Discovery). NW Mediterranean: floats 209-227 (Feb-Mar 1969, RRS Discovery). The reports were produced by the National Institute of Oceanography (NIO), which later became the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences Deacon Laboratory.