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Buckinghamshire

12 record(s)

 

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  • This dataset details the germination rates of seeds from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site, Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and stored under glasshouse conditions. Upon fruit maturation, 20 seeds from each of the 48 field exposed plants was sown into compost and the number which successfully germinated was counted. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f9dd7a39-f408-4e11-8819-46afa05457bd

  • This dataset details the number of seeds produced by pollinator exposed and supplemented Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays were introduced across the study site. Arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100ha replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). After 16 days plants were collected in and one flower from each plant was supplemented with outcrossed pollen. Upon fruit maturation the mean number of seeds counted from pollinator exposed fruit were then compared to the number of seeds from supplemented fruit to determine the degree of pollen limitation in relation to habitat context. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8caf2d8a-564d-4f2e-a797-174165a83796

  • Land use/land cover (LULC) map of a 20km2 agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. The map is based on remote sensed data (LiDAR and hyperspectral sensors) with manual updates and the addition of spring and summer floral cover data from comprehensive field surveys. The remote sensed data was generated in August 2007. The manual updates and summer floral data were from field visits in July and August 2011, and the spring floral data were from field visits in April 2011 and 2012. The map was created as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0667cf06-f2c3-45c1-a80a-e48539b52427

  • This dataset contains plant community data from a hedgerow experiment investigating the effects of cutting regimes on plant species richness. There were four sites, one in Buckinghamshire, two in Oxfordshire and one in Devon. Data were collected in 2016, using 1m x 10m quadrats on each side of the hedgerow at two positions. One quadrat was situated beneath the woody vegetation of the hedge (inner) and one adjacent to the inner quadrat (outer) to sample plant communities growing beside the hedge. Percentage vegetation cover was surveyed up to a height of 80cm. The hedgerow experiment was one of three long running hedgerow experiments focusing on management to maintain and restore the hedgerow resource under agri-environment schemes. These long running experiments were funded by Defra and managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cfeceb7e-b6b5-4f40-a1bc-c25f38deeb9f

  • Family lineage relationships between spring queens, daughter workers and sister queens of three bumblebee species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius and B. pascuorum) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, between spring 2011 and spring 2012. A combination of land-use and habitat surveys, molecular genetics and spatial modelling was used to estimate the locations of wild colonies represented by greater than 1 worker and to calculate the proportions of cover represented by different habitat quality and land-use variables within four spatial scales from each colony location. Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6be00174-6544-4156-b1df-8678f6df2034

  • This dataset contains a list of pollinator species caught within pan traps from habitats comprising different floral cover. Data were collected from the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire in June 2015. Surveys were conducted alongside four experimental arrays of the Californian poppy, Eschscholzia californica, located with two habitats; a sown wildflower mix and bare, fallow ground. This set-up was repeated over four 100ha blocks separated at a distance greater than 500m. Pan traps comprised three water-filled circular plastic bowls (80 x 200 mm) painted with non-toxic fluorescent paint (1 yellow, 1 blue and 1 white; UV Gear, UK) placed in the centre of each array. Traps were deployed for 24 hours at each of the 16 arrays on the same day, twice weekly over the 16 day study period (totalling four surveys). Each survey was done in randomised order, between 0930 and 1700. All insects from the main pollinator groups (Hymenoptera: Apoidea, Diptera: Syrphidae and Lepidoptera) were counted and identified to species level. The intertegular span (the distance between the wing bases) of each insect from the main pollinator groups was then measured using digital callipers. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/01906784-6742-44bf-b244-a4b63bed8d82

  • This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). On each plant, the seed set was measured for flowers which were exposed and excluded from pollinators to determine the effects of habitat context on plant reproduction. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b400b69-b828-45e8-b04e-7ccbfdb0987f

  • This dataset contains locations of worker bumblebees of five species (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum, B. ruderatus) across an agricultural landscape centred on the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Locations were recorded in the field using a handheld GPS unit. Workers were non-lethally DNA sampled between June and August 2011, and genetic analysis used to confirm species and assign individuals to full-sib groups (colonies). Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a60f52b8-0f9f-44f6-aca4-861cb461a0eb

  • Microsatellite data for five species of common and declining bumblebee (Bombus terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus) collected across the Hillesden Estate, Buckinghamshire, UK, in summer 2011. Worker genotypes were determined from individuals sampled across an agricultural landscape and queen genotypes were reconstructed from sampled worker offspring. Data were collected as part of a project led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, funded under the Insect Pollinators Initiative. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6a408415-0575-49c6-af69-b568e343266d

  • This dataset details the paternity of progeny from Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Plants were genotyped at seven microsatellite markers before being introduced across the study site to form experimental arrays. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were placed at 50m intervals along a 150m transect laid symmetrically across the boundary between an established wildflower patch and bare, fallow ground or grazed grassland (two arrays within the florally rich habitat and two arrays within the florally poor habitat). Upon maturation approximately 10 seeds were collected from each plant and genotyped. Fragment analysis was conducted and alleles were scored on Genemarker. Seeds were then manually scored as outcrossed or selfed and paternity was determined using Cervus. The dataset was part of a larger experiment looking at the effect of floral resources on the pollination services to isolated plants. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/7b721c07-bc38-4815-8669-4675867663d0