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  • The dataset consists of diameter at breast height (DBH) measurements taken from trees and shrubs recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4d93f9ac-68e3-49cf-8a41-4d02a7ead81a

  • The dataset consists of location records of the Harlequin ladybird (Harmonia axyridis) in the UK. The records span from 2004 to 2016 with three records from 2003. Records were collected from several sources with the majority coming from online recording via the Harlequin Ladybird Survey website, the UK Ladybird Survey website and the iRecord Ladybird app. Other records have come from coleopterists and from a data call for the most recent ladybird atlas (e.g. local record centres, natural history societies, county Coleoptera recorders). The records include location, date and vice county, as well as life stage and colour form where available. The arrival of the Harlequin ladybird has provided a unique opportunity to study the spread of an invasive animal from the start of the invasion process. The advancements in modern technology, in particular the internet, has also provided new opportunities for recording and has enabled engagement with a far wider audience than was previously possible. This has allowed the ladybird surveys to deal efficiently with large volumes of data and verify and validate submitted records quickly. The data authors are extremely grateful to the many thousands of people across Britain who have contributed their ladybird findings to the UK Ladybird Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/70ee24a5-d19c-4ca8-a1ce-ca4b51e54933

  • This dataset consists of the vascular plants, bryophytes and lichens recorded in plots in 103 woodland sites surveyed across Great Britain in 1971 and again over the growing seasons of 2000, 2002 and 2003 (referred to as '2001 survey'), using exactly the same field methods. Data were collected under projects managed by The Nature Conservancy (in 1971) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (in 2001). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2d023ce9-6dbe-4b4f-a0cd-34768e1455ae

  • This dataset consists of farm management data which includes crop drilling dates and herbicide application dates. The data relate to arable fields in which a range of ecological measurements were collected, including species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. Each field was sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional crops, either Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape or Winter-sown oilseed Rape. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, ITE (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, CEH), the Institute of Arable Crop Research (now Rothamstead Research, IACR) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute, SCRI (now the James Hutton Institute, JHI). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape).

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional maize crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology &Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ca6752ed-3a22-4790-a86d-afadaedda082

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional spring-sown oilseed rape crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0023bd6e-4dd7-462c-aacf-f13083b054ab

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional winter-sown oilseed rape crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/37a503da-d75c-4d72-8e8b-b11c2fdc7d92