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Brassica napus

13 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 13
  • The data set describes the effects of three neonicotinoid seed treatments (clothianidin, thiamethoxam and a control) applied to winter sown oilseed rape in Hungary, Germany and the UK on honeybees (Apis mellifera). The data describes population responses in terms of European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) primary (colony strength and overwintering success) and secondary assessment endpoints for the response of honeybees to exposure to the neonicotinoids. Information on expression of neonicotinoids in the pollen and nectar from the crop or collected by bees is also included, as well as details of honeybee diseases and foraging preferences. This research was undertaken by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology in 2015 and was funded by Syngenta Ltd. and Bayer CropScience. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/eac530fe-54ad-4570-83d3-c59e70c0af9d

  • Yield data on winter sown oilseed rape plants, in relation to pollination by insects and in relation to the ecosystem services provided by beneficial insects. Data includes yield assessed for entire field, whole plant and within different parts of the plant (per raceme and per pod). These data can be linked to the related natural enemy data set and the pollinator data set collected as part of the Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/fc219733-a8e8-4ec0-a34e-e0e8115f0d68

  • This dataset contains counts of pollinators visiting different varieties of oilseed rape (OSR). Data were collected from four trial sites in the UK in May 2012. The trial sites comprised of 20 varieties (plots) replicated in three blocks on each farm but only 2 of the blocks at each site were used for pollinator observations. Pollinator observations were also only made where there were greater than 30 percent of OSR plants in flower in the plot and only when weather conditions were within standardised limits. For each plot per site a six minute observation period was made during which the number of pollinators within the following taxon groups were counted: bumblebees to the species level, solitary bees identified to general body forms (Lasiglossum to genus level; Osmia separated to bicolour and rufa; Andrena separated to body forms typical of dorsata, carantonica, nigroaenea, haemorrhoa, fulva, flavipies, nitida, cineraria, bicolour and minuta), large hoverflies (> 12 mm), small hoverflies (< 11 mm), and Bibionidae. Each variety was observed for two separate six minute periods to reduce the impacts of minor fluctuations in weather that may reduce pollinator observations within single six minute periods. The dataset was collected as part of a project which aimed to identify key pollinators for OSR and identify if there are feeding preferences for individual varieties. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7b25308-3ec7-4cff-8eed-fe20b815f964

  • This dataset contains percentage cover of plants, mean numbers of aphids, mean counts of predators and mean counts of herbivores on three crops (field bean, wheat and oilseed rape) within different grassland types (improved, restored and species rich). Data were collected in 2013 on five farms in the Salisbury Plain area of the UK as part of the Wessex Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Sustainability (BESS) project within the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) BESS programme. This data set was used to provide an assessment of the potential for different grassland types to provide natural pest control ecosystem services. The study uses sentinel plants of the three crops established in the grasslands to monitor herbivorous pest insects, predatory insect occurrence and the population growth rates of artificially established aphids. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4c02ae08-5703-46f4-947e-80e5d0a34a28

  • The number and type of natural enemies of crop pests found in winter-sown oilseed rape fields (Brassica napus L.) in relation to local plant diversity (in crop and field margin) and landscape characteristics. Natural enemies and pests were collected using two methods (suction sampling and pitfall traps). Local plant diversity was assessed using quadrats in field margins and in cropped area. The presence of hedges was also recorded. Landscape characteristics include the amount of mass flowering crops, arable land, presence of patches of different grassland types (intensive, restored and species rich) and the amount of grasslands and other semi natural habitat with up to a 3km radius of the collection points. These data were collected as part of Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. This dataset can be used in conjunction with other Wessex BESS WP4 datasets. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6e2be4d6-a681-4ae5-8abf-0c3fc150365d

  • The number of pollen grains delivered to stigmas in a single visit by flower visitors (from insect orders Coleoptera, Hymenoptera and Diptera) to oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) in southern England. Behavioural and morphological data were also recorded for a subset of visits to understand common traits which led to improved pollen delivery. These data were collected as part of Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. This dataset can be used in conjunction with other Wessex BESS datasets, in particular the landscape scale survey of pollinators. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ee145769-2853-4a89-8aa6-c4a5149d07c0

  • This dataset describes the effects of three neonicotinoid seed treatments (clothianidin, thiamethoxam and a control) applied to winter sown oilseed rape in Hungary, Germany and the UK on wild pollinators. This dataset focuses on two wild pollinator model systems, specifically the solitary bee Osmia bicornis and bumblebee Bombus terrestris. The data describes population responses in terms of reproductive cell production (O. bicornis), numbers of different developmental stages in colonies (B. terrestris) as well as the presence of neonicotinoid residues in pollen and nectar collected by both species. This research was undertaken in 2015 using funding from the Natural Environmental Research Council on an experimental platform funded by Syngenta Ltd. and Bayer CropScience. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b75b40f6-cdb1-4bfd-a599-bd2e171512e7

  • This dataset contains yield data for wheat, oilseed rape and field beans grown in fields under different agri-environment practices. The fields were located at the Hillesden Estate in Buckinghamshire, UK, where a randomised block experiment had been implemented to examine the effects of converting differing proportions of arable land to wildlife habitat. The fields were planted with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) followed by break crops of either oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) or field beans (Vicia faba L.). Three treatments were applied at random: a control ("business as usual"), Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) treatment and ELS Extra treatment. The ELS treatment involved removing 1% of land to create wildlife habitats. The ELS Extra had a greater proportion of land removed (6%) and additional wildlife habitats included. The total yield of each crop was measured at the time of harvesting using a yield meter attached to the combine harvester. From these values, yield per hectare and the ratio of crop yield to regional average yield were calculated. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/e54069b6-71a9-4b36-837f-a5e3ee65b4de

  • This dataset contains data on insects observed visiting flowers of three crops (apples, field beans and oilseed rape) and responses by recorders to a questionnaire asking about their experience carrying out pollinator surveys. Data from thirteen flowering crop fields was collected by teams based at the University of Reading and the James Hutton Institute in Scotland. Data was collected by different recorders, some of whom were novice data collectors, experienced researchers or farmers and agronomists. Recorders were asked to implement three methods: pan trapping, transect walking and/or hand pollination and plant bagging. Transects involved walking a 50m transect recording floral visitors to crop flowers within a 1m squared moving observation widow next to the recorder. Pan trapping involved placing out three coloured water trap arrays along a 50m transect and then recording what flying insects were caught in the water traps at the end of the survey. Hand pollination and plant bagging involved putting mesh bags over flowers to exclude visitation by insects, hand pollinating crop flowers and counting and marking flowers with cable ties. Data were collected between April and July 2015 from sites across the UK. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5822900b-3af4-4bb9-a2d6-0b5d384e2a3c

  • This dataset consists of a range of ecological measurements collected from a set of arable fields, each sown with a combination of genetically modified and conventional spring-sown oilseed rape crops. Measurements include species counts in the following areas: weed seedbank, vegetation in the crop, field edge vegetation, invertebrates. The data were collected as part of the Farm Scale Evaluations (FSEs), a four-year programme of research by independent researchers aimed at studying the effect that the management practices associated with Genetically Modified Herbicide Tolerant (GMHT) crops might have on farmland wildlife, when compared with weed control used with non-GM crops. Data were collected by a consortium of: the Institute of Terrestrial Ecology (now the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology), the Institute of Arable Crops Research (now Rothamsted Research) and the Scottish Crop Research Institute (now the James Hutton Institute). Data were collected for four crops overall (Beet, Maize, Spring-sown Oilseed Rape and Winter-sown oilseed Rape). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0023bd6e-4dd7-462c-aacf-f13083b054ab