nonCciKeyword

Biodiversity

163 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 163
  • This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests’ (ECOFOR), within the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b05caee-a3c8-46a7-b675-e5a94554bd9f

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 1, 2021]. This dataset contains pollinator abundance data from 13 calcareous grassland, 13 heathland and 12 woodland sites within Dorset, UK. The sites were selected to represent a range of habitat types across a condition gradient as measured by levels of degradation from the original habitat. The original habitats were identified as being calcareous grassland, heathland or woodland from a survey conducted in the 1930s. Butterflies, bees, hoverflies, flies and beetles were recorded to species level and the plant species insects were foraging on was also recorded. Data were collected on three different dates in 2017 and 2018: calcareous grassland in June, July and August; heathland transects in May, August and September; and woodland transects in May, June and July. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/190b7ef8-1997-4424-a087-882cd7673e23

  • This dataset gives axiophyte score for plants in Great Britain, based on Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI) published lists of axiophytes for 24 counties in Great Britain. Axiophytes have been defined as 'worthy plants', that is, species that are indicative of high quality habitat within a particular region. This information product takes the county lists that were available in May 2016, and summarises the data in order to produce national (i.e. Great Britain) level scores of 'axiophyte-ness'; that is, the extent to which a species has been selected as a good indicator of high quality habitat where it occurs. This meta-list of axiophytes will be updated in the future as more county-level lists become available. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/af2ac4af-12c6-4152-8ed7-e886ed19622b

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 1, 2021]. This dataset contains botanical data from 13 calcareous grassland, 13 heathland and 12 woodland sites within Dorset, UK. The sites were selected to represent a range of habitat types across a condition gradient as measured by levels of degradation from the original habitat. The original habitats were identified as being calcareous grassland, heathland or woodland from a survey conducted in the 1930s. Within heathland and calcareous grassland sites the percentage cover of all plant species were recorded within five 1m quadrat squares. Plants were recorded to species level where possible, or genus where species level was not possible. Covers of bare ground and litter were also recorded. Within woodlands plots, sampling was done slightly differently to enable recording of ground level plants and species within multiple canopy levels. Cover and presence of all herbaceous species were recorded in 2m quadrat squares, cover of tree seedlings (<1.5 m height) were recorded in 5m quadrat squares and ground-level cover of trunk of tree species if necessary were recorded in 10m quadrat squares. Heathland and calcareous grassland sites were visited in summer 2017 and woodland sites were visited in summer 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a75395f-7858-40a2-8364-eb3482aeaad1

  • [This dataset is embargoed until December 1, 2021]. This dataset contains terrestrial fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), methane (CH4) and ecosystem respiration (carbon dioxide (CO2)) calculated from static chamber measurements in mature oil palm plantations on mineral soil, managed by Sinar Mas Agro Resources and Technology Research Institute (SMARTRI) and located on the Ujung Tanjung Estate in Riau, Sumatra, Indonesia. Measurements were made monthly, from October 2018 until September 2019. A total of 54 static chambers were installed across nine plots, representing three different understory vegetation treatments: normal complexity (an intermediate-level of understory spraying with herbicide); reduced complexity (spraying of all understory vegetation with herbicides); and enhanced complexity (no herbicide spraying and limited understory cutting). Six chambers were installed in each of the nine plots, resulting in 18 replicates of each treatment. In addition, soil moisture measurements were also taken around each chamber. The dataset was associated with a foreign research permit, issued by Foreign Research Permit Division Ministry of Research and Technology/National Research and Innovation Agency, Indonesia. As the project spanned two years it was covered by two permits, RISTEK permit number: 323/SIP/FRP/E5/Dit.KI/X/2018 and RISTEK permit number: 8B/TKPIPA/E5/Dit.KI/VIII/2019. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/378f028d-ab04-4fa5-a5ca-61f78ea0adb0

  • The data comprise a long-term study of alpine plant community dynamics in the Gunnison National Forest of Colorado. The data comprise annual census data for all plants (including seedlings) in each of 50 2x2m plots, including information on size, reproduction, life stage, and mortality, with all plants identified and geo-located. These data are also made available transformed to provide individual-level estimates of growth, survival, fecundity, and recruitment. The dataset covers several thousand individuals of approximately twenty species, and highlights an apparent pattern of demographic decline. The data also include information on microenvironment / microedaphic variation at 2 m resolution covering the entire research site, including information on temperatures, topography, soil chemistry, soil texture, and other variables. The data also include information on the functional traits of many of the species present at the site, including information on biomass allocation, leaf traits, root traits, seed traits, and floral traits. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d850fcd2-b70a-415e-acf4-fc27b38d59c1

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 30, 2021]. The dataset consists of plant species data from a range of upland vegetation types. The study sites are situated within the Moor House National Nature Reserve in the North Pennines, UK. The area is grazed by free-ranging sheep and paired plots of grazed and ungrazed vegetation were set up at nine locations between 1953 and 1972. These plots have been monitored using the same (pin frame) methods at irregular intervals between their establishment and 2016. Within each plot fixed transect and frame positions are used. The data includes structural and frequency data for vascular plants and presence/absence data for bryophytes and lichens. The plots were set up and are currently maintained by Natural England (NE) and its predecessor bodies and since 1982 they have been monitored by the Environmental Change Network (ECN) through the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (UKCEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c72ab043-1b02-42c9-94e8-c1cae42b3dc8

  • This dataset consists of fecundity (number of eggs) data on Pike (Esox lucius) from net sampling in Windermere. Data collection began in 1963. The data were initially collected by the Freshwater Biological Association (FBA) but have been collected by CEH and its predecessor Institute of Freshwater Ecology (IFE) since 1989. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/b8886915-14cb-44df-86fa-7ab718acf49a

  • This dataset constains information on population counts in experimental populations of Plodia interpunctella (Pyralidae; Hübner) and the parasitoid wasp Venturia canescens (Ichneumonidae; Gravenhorst). The data was collected from a multi-generation microcosm experiment carried out to characterise the combined effects of daily stochastic temperature fluctuations and resource degradation on population responses in the Plodia-Venturia host-parasitoid trophic interaction. The population count data include the weekly total numbers of dead adult hosts and parasitoids and the numbers of live early (L1-L3) and late (L4-L5) host instars and of host and parasitoid pupae in half sections of diet removed weekly and replaced by fresh diet (half sections are a 12th of experimental population boxes). The temperature time series data include the date and daily temperature in the fluctuating temperatures treatment. Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/54b722a7-7cda-4817-86a5-b96ad0bb4ae7

  • The dataset includes data on vegetation composition, flower counts, berry availability over winter, pollinator visitation rates, invertebrate, hedge structure and hedgerow regrowth from a set of long running hedgerow experiments. There were three experiments in total. Experiment 1 was based in Monks Wood, Cambridgeshire, and was used to investigate the long-term effects of timing and frequency of cutting on resource provision for wildlife. Experiment 2 was based at 5 sites across Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Devon and was used to investigate the effect of timing, intensity and frequency of hedgerow cutting. Experiment 3 was based at 5 sites across Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire and was used to investigate the effects of different rejuvenation techniques on hedgerows. All three experiments were randomised plot experiments (full details of plots and their treatments can be found in the supporting documentation. The majority of the data was collected between 2010 and 2016 but for one experiment there is data from 2005. The long running hedgerow experiments had two linked aims focused on management to maintain and restore the hedgerow resource under the agri-environment schemes: • to examine the effects of simple cutting management regimes promoted by Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) and Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) on the quality and quantity of wildlife habitat, and food resources in hedgerows; and • to identify, develop and test low-cost, practical options for hedgerow restoration and rejuvenation applicable at the large-scale under both ELS and HLS. This research was funded by Defra (project number BD2114: Effects of hedgerow management and restoration on biodiversity) and managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/95259623-f0b6-4328-a0e3-4aec09ede5b5