nonCciKeyword

Biodiversity

169 record(s)

 

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  • This dataset gives axiophyte score for plants in Great Britain, based on Botanical Society of Britain and Ireland (BSBI) published lists of axiophytes for 24 counties in Great Britain. Axiophytes have been defined as 'worthy plants', that is, species that are indicative of high quality habitat within a particular region. This information product takes the county lists that were available in May 2016, and summarises the data in order to produce national (i.e. Great Britain) level scores of 'axiophyte-ness'; that is, the extent to which a species has been selected as a good indicator of high quality habitat where it occurs. This meta-list of axiophytes will be updated in the future as more county-level lists become available. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/af2ac4af-12c6-4152-8ed7-e886ed19622b

  • This dataset contains pollinator abundance data from 13 calcareous grassland, 13 heathland and 12 woodland sites within Dorset, UK. The sites were selected to represent a range of habitat types across a condition gradient as measured by levels of degradation from the original habitat. The original habitats were identified as being calcareous grassland, heathland or woodland from a survey conducted in the 1930s. Butterflies, bees, hoverflies, flies and beetles were recorded to species level and the plant species insects were foraging on was also recorded. Data were collected on three different dates in 2017 and 2018: calcareous grassland in June, July and August; heathland transects in May, August and September; and woodland transects in May, June and July. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/190b7ef8-1997-4424-a087-882cd7673e23

  • This data set includes longitudinal occurrence of bird species at 36 forest plots – half of which burned during the 2015-16 El Niño drought – distributed across a gradient of prior human disturbance in the Brazilian Amazon. Data was collected in 2010 and 2016 (around 6 years before, and one year after the 2015-16 El Niño, respectively) as part of the projects ‘Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems’ (AFIRE) and ‘Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests’ (ECOFOR), within the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4b05caee-a3c8-46a7-b675-e5a94554bd9f

  • This dataset contains botanical data from 13 calcareous grassland, 13 heathland and 12 woodland sites within Dorset, UK. The sites were selected to represent a range of habitat types across a condition gradient as measured by levels of degradation from the original habitat. The original habitats were identified as being calcareous grassland, heathland or woodland from a survey conducted in the 1930s. Within heathland and calcareous grassland sites the percentage cover of all plant species were recorded within five 1m quadrat squares. Plants were recorded to species level where possible, or genus where species level was not possible. Covers of bare ground and litter were also recorded. Within woodlands plots, sampling was done slightly differently to enable recording of ground level plants and species within multiple canopy levels. Cover and presence of all herbaceous species were recorded in 2m quadrat squares, cover of tree seedlings (<1.5 m height) were recorded in 5m quadrat squares and ground-level cover of trunk of tree species if necessary were recorded in 10m quadrat squares. Heathland and calcareous grassland sites were visited in summer 2017 and woodland sites were visited in summer 2018. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/8a75395f-7858-40a2-8364-eb3482aeaad1

  • [This dataset is embargoed until April 30, 2021]. The dataset consists of plant species data from a range of upland vegetation types. The study sites are situated within the Moor House National Nature Reserve in the North Pennines, UK. The area is grazed by free-ranging sheep and paired plots of grazed and ungrazed vegetation were set up at nine locations between 1953 and 1972. These plots have been monitored using the same (pin frame) methods at irregular intervals between their establishment and 2016. Within each plot fixed transect and frame positions are used. The data includes structural and frequency data for vascular plants and presence/absence data for bryophytes and lichens. The plots were set up and are currently maintained by Natural England (NE) and its predecessor bodies and since 1982 they have been monitored by the Environmental Change Network (ECN) through the UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology (UKCEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c72ab043-1b02-42c9-94e8-c1cae42b3dc8

  • This web map shows positive plant habitat condition indicators across Great Britain (GB). This data provides a metric of plant diversity weighted by the species that you would expect and desire to have in a particular habitat type so indicates habitat condition. In each Countryside Survey 2007 area vegetation plot the number of positive plant habitat indicators (taken from a list created from Common Standards Monitoring Guidance and consultation with the Botanical society of the British Isles (BSBI)) for the habitat type in which the plot is located are counted. This count is then divided by the possible indicators for that habitat type (and multiplied by 100) to get a percentage value. This is extrapolated to 1km squares across GB using a generalised additive mixed model. Co-variables used in the model are Broad Habitat (the dominant broad habitat of the 1km square), air temperature, nitrogen deposition, sulphur deposition, precipitation and whether the plot is located in a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) (presence or absence data).

  • Data comprise monitoring records of a population of Gryllus campestris, a flightless, univoltine field cricket that lives in and around burrows excavated among the grass in a meadow in Asturias (North Spain). The area has an altitude range from around 60 to 270 metres above sea level. The data include birth and death days, age at capture, air temperature and calling activity. Data were collected from 2006 to 2016. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5c8c8f74-5287-4251-87f7-2b965b400624

  • This dataset consists of stock (area) data for Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) Broad Habitats across Great Britain in 1978. Data are presented as areas of Broad (or Priority) Habitats within a set of 256 1km squares across Great Britain. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to habitat areas, vegetation species data, soil data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/86c017ba-dc62-46f0-ad13-c862bf31740e

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains calculated breeding success rates for six seabird species from representative colonies on the Isle of May, off the East coast of Scotland. Annual breeding success has been measured as the number of chicks fledged per active nest for the Atlantic puffin (Fratercula arctica, since 1982), common guillemot (Uria aalge, since 1982), razorbill (Alca torda, since 1982), European shag (Phalacrocorax aristotelis, since 1987), black-legged kittiwake (Rissa tridactyla, since 1987) and northern fulmar (Fulmarus glacialis, since 1987). The number of active nests recorded are also provided. Data were collected as part of the Isle of May long-term study (IMLOTS), which aims to identify the impact of environmental change on seabirds and their associated ecosystems. This monitoring has been ongoing since 1974, by essentially the same team of scientists, using the same well-documented methods throughout this time. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d38b609b-7bc1-4204-86dd-022375208d4f

  • The dataset includes data on vegetation composition, flower counts, berry availability over winter, pollinator visitation rates, invertebrate, hedge structure and hedgerow regrowth from a set of long running hedgerow experiments. There were three experiments in total. Experiment 1 was based in Monks Wood, Cambridgeshire, and was used to investigate the long-term effects of timing and frequency of cutting on resource provision for wildlife. Experiment 2 was based at 5 sites across Oxfordshire, Buckinghamshire and Devon and was used to investigate the effect of timing, intensity and frequency of hedgerow cutting. Experiment 3 was based at 5 sites across Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire and was used to investigate the effects of different rejuvenation techniques on hedgerows. All three experiments were randomised plot experiments (full details of plots and their treatments can be found in the supporting documentation. The majority of the data was collected between 2010 and 2016 but for one experiment there is data from 2005. The long running hedgerow experiments had two linked aims focused on management to maintain and restore the hedgerow resource under the agri-environment schemes: • to examine the effects of simple cutting management regimes promoted by Entry Level Stewardship (ELS) and Higher Level Stewardship (HLS) on the quality and quantity of wildlife habitat, and food resources in hedgerows; and • to identify, develop and test low-cost, practical options for hedgerow restoration and rejuvenation applicable at the large-scale under both ELS and HLS. This research was funded by Defra (project number BD2114: Effects of hedgerow management and restoration on biodiversity) and managed by the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/95259623-f0b6-4328-a0e3-4aec09ede5b5