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Antarctica

27 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 27
  • Turbulent velocity fluctuations in the ice shelf-ocean boundary layer beneath Larsen C Ice Shelf were observed using two turbulence instrument clusters (TICs) deployed 2.5 m and 13.5 m beneath the ice shelf base in December 2011. Each TIC sampled the velocity fluctuations at a rate of 5 Hz, and were operated in burst mode with 15 minutes of data being collected every two hours. 4600 bursts were collected over a period of 392 days. 320 bursts failed the quality control checks, and were removed from the dataset. The TICs were deployed as part of the UK Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Sub Ice Shelf Boundary Layer Experiment. Funding was provided by the NERC grant NE/H009205/1.

  • Shapefile map of exposed rock outcrops for the Antarctic continent. The map was produced via a new fully automated methodology for differentiating rock from snow, clouds and sea using Landsat 8 multispectral imagery. Data was merged with the existing Antarctic Digital Database rock outcrop dataset for areas for those areas where Landsat 8 tiles were unavailable (south of 82 deg 40 S).

  • The Antarctic Digital Database (ADD) is the premier source of vector topographic data for Antarctica. First published on CD-ROM in 1993, the current version is available for download from http://www.add.scar.org/. The data are supplied in ARC/INFO uncompressed export format, compressed and encrypted for download using zip.

  • Seventy-nine Antarctic ice core snow accumulation records were gathered as part of a community led project coordinated by the PAGES Antarctica 2k working group. Individual ice core records (kg m2 yr-1) were normalised relative to a reference period (1960-1990). The normalised records were separated into seven geographical regions and averaged together to form the regional composites. The seven geographical regions are: East Antarctica; Wilkes Land Coast; Weddell Sea Coast; Antarctic Peninsula; West Antarctic Ice Sheet; Victoria Land; and Dronning Maud Land. Full data description and methods can be found in Thomas et al., 2017. This record also includes the original data, from which the composite records were produced. This dataset represents an updated version of another published dataset. The update was necessary due to erroneous data contained in the files. Please use this corrected dataset in preference to the other one.

  • This data set contains aeromagnetic data collected opportunistically during an airborne radar survey of the Brunt Ice Shelf as part of the NERC/BAS Life Time of Halley project. The survey was flown draped with an average height above the ice surface of 420m, and includes 4716 km of new data. The aircraft used was the BAS aerogeophysically equipped twin otter VP-FBL. Data are available include all data streams from raw to fully processed, following the ADMAP 2 naming convention, and are provided in both Geosoft database (.gdb) and ASCII file formats (.xyz). Base station data is also provided.

  • This dataset documents the trends and variability in the latitude and strength of the belt of lower-atmosphere westerly winds over the Southern Ocean, referred to as the ''westerly jet''. Time series of annual mean and seasonal diagnostics are available for the period 1979-present, specifically time series of seasonal and annual mean jet latitude and strength. The diagnostics are derived from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim reanalysis (for more information see www.ecmwf.int and Dee et al. (2011)), which is an observationally-constrained reconstruction of atmospheric conditions. The broad characterisation of the westerly winds into these simple diagnostics has been found to be useful for understanding long-term climate change due to contrasting drivers of change and impacts on other aspects of the climate system. This is an index of winds around the full circumference of all longitudes at Southern Hemisphere middle latitudes. The exact latitude depends on the position of the jet at any given time, but on average the jet (the core of the westerlies) is located at approximately 52 deg S.

  • The datasets are temperature time series from strings of thermistors, each located at a discrete depth within one of six boreholes drilled to a depth of ~100 m in the northern sector of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Supporting borehole information is presented by Ashmore and others (2017). These data are part of the NERC-funded MIDAS (''Impact of surface melt and ponding on ice shelf dynamics and stability'') research project, with grant references NE/L006707/1 and NE/L005409/1. Associated (near-surface) borehole temperature records, OPTV logs and density records are also available, as are other MIDAS datasets.

  • The datasets are temperature time series from thermistor strings installed into two boreholes drilled to a depth of ~7 m in the northern sector of Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Supporting borehole information is presented by Ashmore and others (2017). These data are part of the NERC-funded MIDAS (''Impact of surface melt and ponding on ice shelf dynamics and stability'') research project, with grant references NE/L006707/1 and NE/L005409/1. Associated (longer) borehole temperature records, OPTV logs and density records are also available, as are other MIDAS datasets.

  • Polar View delivers a range of environmental information services for the polar regions derived primarily from satellite imagery and data. The project aims to coordinate delivery of these information products direct to users. Services include enhanced sea ice information (charts and forecasts) as well as ice-edge and iceberg monitoring data. We also provide monitoring services for lake and river ice, snow cover maps and glacier monitoring and assessment. any services are delivered in near real time and are readily accessible via the Internet.

  • These are vertical density profiles of snow, firn and ice reconstructed from the vertical luminosity trace of digital optical televiewer (OPTV) logs of five boreholes drilled by hot water to ~100 m depth in Larsen C Ice Shelf, Antarctica. Boreholes were drilled in austral summers of 2014 and 2015 in order to investigate the internal properties of the ice shelf, and specifically the influence of surface melting and melt pond formation on those properties. These data are part of the NERC-funded MIDAS (''Impact of surface melt and ponding on ice shelf dynamics and stability'') research project, with grant references NE/L006707/1 and NE/L005409/1. The associated borehole OPTV logs and temperature profiles are also available, as are other MIDAS datasets.