nonCciKeyword

Amazonia

5 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Keywords

Topics

Contact for the resource

Provided by

Years

Formats

Representation types

Update frequencies

Resolution

Regions

GEMET keywords

From 1 - 5 / 5
  • Spatial data files holding gridded parameter maps of surface soil hydraulic parameters derived from a selection of pedotransfer functions. Modern land surface model simulations capture soil profile water movement through the use of soil hydraulics sub-models, but good hydraulic parameterisations are often lacking - especially in the tropics - and it is this lack that we fill here in the context of South America. Optimal hydraulic parameter values are given for the Brooks and Corey, Campbell, van Genuchten-Mualem and van Genuchten-Burdine soil hydraulic models, which are widely-used hydraulic sub-models in many land surface models (e.g. Joint UK Land Environment Simulator JULES). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/4078678b-768f-43ff-abba-b87712f648e9

  • The data are concentrations of different fluvial carbon species (dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon) which form part of the lateral transport of carbon from the terrestrial to aquatic system. This influences the terrestrial carbon balance as well as being a key part of the freshwater carbon cycle. The submission also contains hydrological (stage height, discharge and water temperature) and water chemistry data (pH, conductivity and oxygen saturation). The data were collected from Peruvian rainforest streams within the NERC funded Amazonica project (NE/F005482/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/507a5e1f-e056-454c-8ff6-d185f3da8556

  • This data set includes longitudinal abundance of dung beetles at dung-baited pitfall traps, recorded in 2010, 2016 and 2017 (around six years before, six months after and 18 months after the 2015-16 El Niño event, respectively) in the Brazilian Amazon region. Dung beetles were collected during the collaborative projects AFIRE (Assessing ENSO-induced Fire Impacts in tropical Rainforest Ecosystems) and ECOFOR (Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning in degraded and recovering Amazonian and Atlantic Forests), which are part of the NERC Human-Modified Tropical Forest (HTMF) programme. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/799db965-3ce7-4e9b-8590-de6a8624d652

  • Aquatic carbon (dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon and the carbon isotopic composition of DIC) and nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) in rainfall fractions (rainwater, throughfall, stemflow and overland flow) were sampled in the Western Amazonian basin. The samples were collected towards the end of a wet season April - May 2012. Rainfall and throughfall samples were collected in plastic buckets. Stemflow samples were collected using stemflow collection systems. Overland samples were collected using a a plastic pipe cut lengthways directing flow into a plastic bucket. Established standard methods were used to analyse the DIC, DOC and nutrients. These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the nutrient and carbon delivery in rainwater as well as leaching from tree canopies, stems and from the soil surface. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded Amazonica project (NE/F005482/1). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/59bdb8f6-fb1f-418f-a53c-394f6c68a334

  • Data from two small streams, two rivers and rainfall fractions in the Western Amazonian basin at Tambopata National Reserve in Madre de Dios region, Peru. Data presented are nutrients (calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, total soluble phosphorus and silica) and fluvial carbon - dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its isotopic composition δ13C-DIC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and particulate organic carbon (POC). Samples were collected during the period from February 2011 to May 2012 targeting both wet and dry seasons. Samples for DIC samples were collected using pre-acidified evacuated Exetainers. Established standard methods were used to take samples for DOC and nutrients. Established standard methods were used to analyse samples for DIC, DOC and nutrients These methods are outlined in the lineage. The samples were taken to understand the hydrological controls on the carbon concentrations and fluxes during different flow conditions. The data collection was carried out as part of the Natural Environment Research Council funded Amazonica project. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ee1b9eb7-6fbd-4dd5-8f8f-e07d32c057e4