nonCciKeyword

Air temperature

106 record(s)

 

Type of resources

Keywords

Topics

INSPIRE themes

Contact for the resource

Provided by

Years

Formats

Representation types

Update frequencies

Resolution

GEMET keywords

From 1 - 10 / 106
  • The Joint North Sea Data Acquisition Project (JONSDAP) dataset comprises hydrographic and meteorological time series, including current velocities, water temperature (both at the sea surface and at depth), hydrographic pressure, air temperature, barometric pressure and wind velocities. The data were collected in the North Sea from March-June 1976. Automatically recording current meters (and usually temperature sensors), off-shore tide gauges, thermistor chains and meteorological data buoys were deployed at numerous locations around the study area for periods of a few days to several weeks. Data from 9 tide gauge, 4 meteorological data buoy, 10 thermistor chain and 81 current meter deployments are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC). Additional hydrographic data were collected during JONSDAP 76 cruises, while over-flights with aircraft provided further measurements. However, these data are not stored at BODC. JONSDAP 76 consisted of two parts: FLEX, the Fladen Ground Experiment between 25 March and 15 June, and INOUT, the inflows of water of the whole North Sea as well as the internal movements from 15 March to 25 April. The data were collected by 13 laboratories in 8 countries.

  • This dataset contains derived annual mean globally averaged variables from an existing global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model and a novel atmosphere-ocean box model to understand surface warming response in terms of changes in global carbon inventories, empirical heat budget, and variation in time with carbon emissions. The source model outputs were generated by Thomas Froelicher in 2015 using a 1000-year simulation of the global coupled carbon-climate Earth System Model developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL ESM2M). A scenario was forced of a 1% annual rate increase in carbon dioxide from preindustrial levels until global mean surface air temperature increased by 2 degrees Celsius since the preindustrial, after this point emissions of carbon were set to zero and all other non-carbon dioxide greenhouse gases were kept at preindustrial levels. Output parameters included: ocean temperature; salinity; dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean alkalinity; dissolved inorganic phosphate; surface air temperature; atmospheric carbon dioxide and cumulative carbon emission. Annual mean variables were then derived from these data. This was determined by calculated changes in: ocean carbon inventory; ocean carbon under saturation; saturated dissolved inorganic carbon; ocean dissolved inorganic carbon; radiative forcing from carbon dioxide; and ocean heat uptake. Additionally the dependence of radiative forcing on carbon emissions, dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing and surface warming dependence on radiative forcing were determined. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere; an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness; and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, however ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. These datasets were generated as part of the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator - Professor Ric Williams, University of Liverpool and Co-Investigator - Dr Philip Goodwin, University of Southampton. Data are acrvhived at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • This Met/Ocean data bank comprises wave, current, water temperature and surface meteorology (air temperature, humidity and wind) data collected at 11 off-shore sites on the UK continental shelf, between 1973 and 1988. Three hourly wave data (short term statistics) and hourly wind observations together with atmospheric pressure, air temperature and, occasionally, sea surface temperature were measured at weather ships (W.S.) Stevenson (61 20.0N, 000 00.0E from 1973 - 1976), Fitzroy (60 00.0N, 004 00.0W from 1973 - 1976) and Boyle (50 40.0N, 007 30.0W from 1974 - 1977). Moored current meter measurements were also made at 2 to 4 depths at each site. Three-hourly measurements of sea temperature, air temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction were collected at the National Data Buoy DB/1 site (48 43.0N, 008 58.0W) between 1978 and 1982. Directional spectra of the wave field were also derived from measurements of heave, pitch and roll of the buoy, while surface currents were measured hourly. DB/1 was succeeded by DB/2 (located at 48 44.0N, 008 50.0W from 1984 - 1986 and at 58 59.0N, 007 13.0W from 1986 - 1988) and DB/3 (60 30.9N, 002 52.0W from 1984 - 1988). Met/Ocean data and directional wave spectra are available from these sites, comprising hourly recordings of wind speed and direction, maximum wind gust speed, air temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure (and pressure trend over three hours), sea temperature, significant wave height and period, maximum wave height, swell wave height, period and direction, wind wave height and period, current speed and direction. The directional wave spectra consist of the 9 co- and quad- spectral densities for 51 frequency slots, plus derived height, period, direction and directional spread of all waves, wind waves, swell waves and spectral peak wave period. The UKOOA dataset also includes measurements from four platforms, with short term wave statistics, hourly wind observations, atmospheric pressure, air temperature and occasionally sea surface temperature data available from Forties (57 45.0N, 001 00.0E) between 1974 and 1980; Brent (61 04.0N, 001 43.0E) between 1975 and 1980; and Beryl/Frigg (59 35.0N, 001 40.0E) between 1979 and 1982. One dimensional wave spectra and meteorological data are available from Foula (60 08.0N, 002 59.0W) between 1977 and 1979. All data were collected by the UK Offshore Operators Association (UKOOA) and are stored at the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC).

  • This dataset consists of high resolution tiff photographed images of tide gauge charts, from various historical tide gauges from the Grand Harbour (Port of Valletta), Malta. Due to the historical nature of these records, there is little associated metadata with the original charts. They come from various individual tide gauge locations around the Grand Harbour (Port of Valletta), Malta, and some are labelled with more specific locations, such as French Creek and Ricasoli Breakwater. General coordinates have been given for the geographic coverage: 14.49E to 14.53E, 35.87N to 35.9N. The earliest chart is from the 01/06/1871 and the latest is from 1926. There are gaps of several years in the dataset. In his 1878 paper, On the tides at Malta, G. B. Airy describes the gauge in operation in 1871: "The float was a copper vessel, nearly spherical, about 8 inches in diameter; a vertical rod attached to it passed freely through a guide, and was hinged to the end of a horizontal lever, of which the arms were so proportioned that each space marked on the tabular form between the horizontal lines [one-fourth of an inch. - G.B.A.] corresponded accurately to an inch rise or fall of the float." "The cylinder on which the paper was wrapped revolved once in 24 hours". It is not known how long this gauge was in operation for, but all of the tide gauges that produced the tide gauge charts in this dataset would have been float gauges. The original charts were collected by the Royal Navy as part of their surveying duties of the Grand Harbour. The United Kingdom Hydrographic Office (UKHO) had these charts in its archives, which were difficult to access and in need of conservation. The charts were conserved and photographed and made publically available as digital images to help preserve one of the longest and earliest temporal series of sea level data in the Mediterranean. The original data were collected by the Royal Navy and were placed in the archives of the Admiralty, now the UKHO. The conserved and photographed images were created by the United Kingdom Hydrographic Office Archives for the MALTESER, MediterrAnean Long TErm SEa level Rescue project and then deposited with the British Oceanographic Data Centre. This project was funded under the Central Government Breakthrough Fund, 2014. Reference: Airy, G. B. (1878). On the tides at Malta. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 169, 123-138.

  • This datasets contains a box model of the atmosphere‐ocean to understand surface warming response and explain how surface warming varies in time with carbon emissions. The box model consists of three homogeneous layers: a well‐mixed atmosphere, an ocean mixed layer with 100‐m thickness, and an ocean interior with 3,900‐m thickness, all assumed to have the same horizontal area. The model solves for the heat and carbon exchange between these layers, including physical and chemical transfers, but ignoring biological transfers, and sediment and weathering interactions. The model is forced from an equilibrium by carbon emitted into the atmosphere with a constant rate of 20 PgC/year for 100 years and integrated for 1,000 years. Ocean ventilation is represented by the ocean interior taking up the heat and carbon properties of the mixed layer on an e-folding time scale of 200 years. The model was generated as part of Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Discovery Science project “Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake” standard grant reference NE/N009789/1 lead by Principal Investigator Professor Ric Williams.Model code and associated metadata are held in the archives at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Other datasets generated by this grant are discoverable via EDMED 6712.

  • This data set comprises a variety of meteorological parameters measured every three hours (some more recent data are at hourly intervals) at the ten North Atlantic Ocean Weather Ships for the periods listed below. OWS Alpha (1947 - 1974); OWS Bravo (1953 - 1973); OWS Charlie (1945 - 1981); OWS Delta (1945 - 1973); OWS India (1947 - 1975); OWS Juliet (1947 - 1975); OWS Kilo (1954 - 1975); OWS Lima (1975 - 1983); OWS Mike (1949 - 1982); OWS Romeo (1975 - 1980). Each OWS record contains data from Norway, the Netherlands, France, Sweden, Russia, the UK and the USA as appropriate. Six of the weatherships ceased operation in the mid-1970s. However data are still being collected by OWS Mike, Romeo, Charlie and Lima. More recent data from these ships may be obtained from the UK Meteorological Office.

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains daily and sub-daily hydrometeorological and soil observations from COSMOS-UK (cosmic-ray soil moisture monitoring network) from the start of the network, in October 2013, to the end of 2016. These data are from 42 sites active across UK during this time, recording a range of hydrometeorological and soil variables. Each site in the network hosts a cosmic-ray sensing probe; a novel sensor technology which can be used, in combination with hydrometeorological data, to calculate the volumetric water content of soil over a field scale. The hydrometeorological and soil data are recorded at a 30 minute resolution and they include neutron counts from the Cosmic-ray sensing probe, humidity and atmospheric pressure data that are used to derive volumetric water content at two temporal resolutions (hourly and daily). Also included are soil heat flux, air temperature, wind speed and net radiation data which are used to derive potential evapotranspiration at a daily resolution. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/02e54a4e-c421-4222-a08b-3708a00495e3

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains daily and sub-daily hydrometeorological and soil observations from COSMOS-UK (cosmic-ray soil moisture monitoring network) from the start of the network, in October 2013, to the end of 2015. These data are from 32 sites active across Great Britain during this time, recording a range of hydrometeorological and soil variables. Each site in the network hosts a cosmic-ray sensing probe; a novel sensor technology which can be used, in combination with hydrometeorological data, to calculate the volumetric water content of soil over a field scale. The hydrometeorological and soil data are recorded at a 30 minute resolution and they include neutron counts from the Cosmic-ray sensing probe, humidity and atmospheric pressure data that are used to derive volumetric water content at two temporal resolutions (hourly and daily). Also included are soil heat flux, air temperature, wind speed and net radiation data which are used to derive potential evapotranspiration at a daily resolution. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/cdcf6ec3-1949-4fe7-a6f2-33c7403eafa1

  • The dataset contains a variety of atmospheric measurements including time series of air temperature, wind speed and direction, precipitation, irradiance and humidity. A comprehensive atmospheric sampling programme provided measurements of atmospheric particulates, aerosols and gases, including hydrocarbons, nitrogen, oxygen, ozone and sulphur species, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and nitrous and hydrochloric acids. Additional measurements of photolysis rates and ion and radical concentrations were also collected. The data were collected from the vicinity of the north Norfolk coast between 1994 and 1997. The bulk of the data were collected during two field campaigns in the winter (October/November) of 1994 and the summer (May/June) of 1995. During these campaigns data were collected continuously from the University of East Anglia (UEA) Atmospheric Observatory at Weybourne on the north Norfolk coast. The widest range of parameters is available for this station. An instrumented vessel (MV Guardian) was stationed offshore to provide a second sampling site to allow changes in a given air mass to be monitored. The Imperial College London Jetstream Research aircraft made one flight during each campaign to provide a link between the two surface stations and four additional flights in 1996 and 1997. The River-Atmosphere-Coast Study (RACS) was the component of the LOIS programme looking at processes from the river catchment into the coastal sea. Professor John Plane from the Environmental Sciences Department at UEA was the scientific co-ordinator of this sub-project of LOIS. The data are held by BODC as a series of ASCII data files conforming to the NASA AMES 1001 format together with a PDF document that describes the data set.

  • This dataset contains a variety of oceanographic and atmospheric measurements including time series of temperature, salinity, current speed and direction and discrete samples of salinity, dissolved oxygen, oxygen isotope and trace gas concentrations of the water column. It also includes atmospheric measurements including temperature, humidity and wind speed and direction. The data were collected in the Amundsen Sea region of the Antarctic between 2012 and 2017. The majority of the data were collected during RRS James Clark Ross cruise JR20140126 from January to March 2014. Moorings were deployed in 2012 and redeployed in 2014, most collected data until 2016. Measurements were taken using a variety of instrumentation, including conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profilers with attached auxiliary sensors, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), Radiosondes and Microstructure profilers (MVP). Discrete water samples were also taken and analysed for salinity, dissolved oxygen and oxygen isotope concentration and trace gas concentrations. Measurements were also taken by CTD profilers, current meters and ADCPs deployed on moorings and by CTDs deployed on tags on seals. The project was designed to discover how and why warm ocean water gets close to the ice shelf in Antarctica (and in particular the Amundsen Sea) and is part of the wider iSTAR programme. The principal investigator for this project is Professor Karen Heywood, University of East Anglia and the project was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council. Data from the project are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre. BODC do not expect to receive data from the Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) deployed by the project. The originator has identified data quality issues with these datasets and has indicated that they won't be supplied. We expect to receive all other data collected by the project. The Korean Polar Research Institute (KOPRI) collected CTD and Lowered Acoustic Doppler Current Profiles (LADCP) data in 2012 (cruise ANA02C- report accessible via http://repository.kopri.re.kr/handle/201206/4603) and 2016 (cruise ANA06B- report not yet available).