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  • This dataset consists of oribatid mite species records (a component of the soil mesofauna), extracted from soils sampled across Great Britain in 1998, as part of the Countryside Survey monitoring programme. The Countryside Survey is a unique study or 'audit' of the natural resources of the UK's countryside. The sample sites are chosen from a stratified random sample, based on a 15 by 15 km grid of GB. Surveys have been carried out in 1978, 1984, 1990, 1998 and 2007 by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, with repeated visits to the majority of squares. The countryside is sampled and surveyed using rigorous scientific methods, allowing us to compare new results with those from previous surveys. In this way we can detect the gradual and subtle changes that occur in the UK's countryside over time. In addition to soil data, habitat areas, vegetation species data, linear habitat data, and freshwater habitat data are also gathered by Countryside Survey. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/05cae9ae-86c4-4a2f-a628-6c7fd0882459

  • Countryside Survey topsoil invertebrate data is representative of 0 - 8 cm soil depth and includes Total catch, Mite:Springtail ratio, Number of broad taxa and Shannon diversity. For invertebrate data, a total of 947 cores from 256 1km x 1km squares across Great Britain were analysed in 2007. Please see Emmett et al. 2010 for further details of sampling and methods (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5201/1/CS_UK_2007_TR3%5B1%5D.pdf ). Estimates of mean values within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB were made using CS data from 1978, 1998 and 2007 using a mixed model approach. Please see Scott, 2008 for further details of similar statistical analysis (http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/5202/1/CS_UK_2007_TR4%5B1%5D.pdf ). The estimated means of habitat /parent material combinations using 2007 data are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. The parent material characteristic used was that which minimised AIC in each model (see Supporting Information). Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat / parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f19de821-a436-4b28-95f6-b7287ef0bf15

  • This web map service (WMS) depicts estimates of mean values of soil bacteria, invertebrates, carbon, nutrients and pH within selected habitats and parent material characteristics across GB . Estimates were made using CS data using a mixed model approach. The estimated means of habitat/parent material combinations using 2007 data are modelled on dominant habitat and parent material characteristics derived from the Land Cover Map 2007 and Parent Material Model 2009, respectively. Bacteria data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes bacterial community structure as assessed by ordination scores. Invertebrate data is representative of 0 - 8 cm soil depth and includes Total catch, Mite:Springtail ratio, Number of broad taxa and Shannon diversity. Gravimetric moisture content (%) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth Carbon data is representative of 0-15 cm soil depth and includes Loss-on-ignition (%), Carbon concentration (g kg-1) and Carbon density (t ha-1). Loss-on-ignition was determined by combustion of 10g dry soil at 375 deg C for 16 hours; carbon concentration was estimated by multiplying LOI by a factor of 0.55, and carbon density was estimated by combining carbon concentration with bulk density estimates. Nutrient data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth and includes total nitrogen (N) concentration (%), C:N ratio and Olsen-Phosphorus (mg/kg). pH and bulk density (g cm-3) data is representative of 0 - 15 cm soil depth. Topsoil pH was measured using 10g of field moist soil with 25ml de-ionised water giving a ratio of soil to water of 1:2.5 by weight; bulk density was estimated by making detailed weight measurements throughout the soil processing procedure. Areas, such as urban and littoral rock, are not sampled by CS and therefore have no associated data. Also, in some circumstances sample sizes for particular habitat/parent material combinations were insufficient to estimate mean values.