Keyword

water vapour

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  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains infa-red images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation satellites over full disc.

  • Ozone and water vapour in the tropopause region was an Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) Round 3 project led by Dr G. Vaughan, Dr J.A. Whiteway, Physics Department University of Wales, Aberystwyth and Dr R.L. Jones, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge. This dataset contains Balloon-borne simultaneous measurements of ozone and water vapour in the tropopause region. The flights were targeted as far as possible at different air masses in the lower stratosphere over Aberystwyth, with a particular emphasis on north-westerly jet streams.

  • The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) was a satellite-borne instrument(on UARS satellite) making limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition at microwave frequencies. The water vapour data was collected by the 183 GHz radiometer which was developed in the UK by Heriot-Watt University and the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. This data set is a prototype version of the MLS water vapour data developed by Dr Hugh Pumphrey in the Meteorology Department at the University of Edinburgh. This work was funded by the NERC. Data generally cover wider altitude range than "official" MLS version 4 retrievals and are available at a higher vertical resolution. The data coverage extends from 80°S to 80°N, but at any one time this is restricted to 34°S to 80°N or 34°N to 80°S. In the vertical, measurements are usually available between 68hPa and 0.031hPa and may extend down 100hPa and up to 0.0031hPa. The data set covers the time period from UARS day 8 (19th September 1991) to UARS day 580 (13th April 1993). IMPORTANT NOTE: V0006 is EXACTLY THE SAME DATA as V0104. Please refer to the "MLS-H2O-versions-explained" documentation under "Docs" for details.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset water vapour images from MSG satellites over Western Europe. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset water vapour images from MSG satellites over the tropics. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • The Cloud and Water Vapour Experiment (CWAVE) was a measurement campaign at the CCLRC-Chilbolton Observatory; it was supporting associated with two EC FP5 projects, CLOUDMAP2 and CLOUDNET. A wide range of satellite and ground based instruments measured a variety of atmospheric properties ranging from cloud parameters to water vapour. In addition, the measurements coincided with the results from a reduced resolution Unified Model (UM) run by the Met Office. This dataset contains Met Office Microwave radiometer (MP series) temperature, water vapour and liquid profiles at Chilbolton Facility for Atmospheric and Radio Research (CFARR)

  • Meteosat-7 and its predecessors were the first generation of earth observation dedicated geostationary satellites located at 36000 km above the intersection of the Equator and the Greenwich Meridian. Although superseded by MSG-1 (renamed Meteosat-8) in 2005, Meteosat-7 remained as back-up at 0o longitude until 14th June 2006. Meteosat-7 will be moved to 63oE longitude to continue coverage of the Indian Ocean and take over from Meteosat-5. Meteosat-7 was launched by the European Space Agency and operated by Eumetsat. This dataset contains water vapour images from Meteosat Geostationary Satellites First Generation satellites over Europe and the North Atlantic.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset water vapour images from MSG satellites over the full disc. Imagery available from December 2006 to April 2008 at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly).

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset water vapour images from MSG satellites over the full disc. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • Ozone and water vapour in the tropopause region was an Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere (UTLS) Round 3 project led by Dr G. Vaughan, Dr J.A. Whiteway, Physics Department University of Wales, Aberystwyth and Dr R.L. Jones, Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge. Dataset contains Balloon-borne simultaneous measurements of ozone and water vapour in the tropopause region. The flights are targeted as far as possible at different air masses in the lower stratosphere over Aberystwyth, with a particular emphasis on north-westerly jet streams. Air at the base of the stratosphere, within 1-2 km of the tropopause, was considered intermediate in character between stratosphere and troposphere. The ozone concentration increases steeply with height from ~80 ppbv at the tropopause to several hundred ppbv 2 km above it. The water vapour concentration was more variable, but generally decreases from ~100 ppmv at the tropopause to the standard 5-6 ppmv in the same height region. Other tracers of tropospheric origin behave likewise, which means that the lowest 2 km of the stratosphere is of quite a different chemical character to the remainder of the stratosphere. Water vapour was a key molecule in the UTLS region, and one that has traditionally been poorly measured above the tropopause. Even though the newest generation of radiosonde at that time (e.g. the Vaisala RS90) performed much better than its predecessors in the upper troposphere it still did not measure adequately in the stratosphere. The MOZAIC humidity sensor was of this type, and was also unable to extend into the stratosphere; indeed, it cannot measure reliably below 100 ppmv in the upper troposphere. Satellite instruments extend water vapour profiles into the UTLS region but their limited resolution in a region of strong vertical gradients limits their value. Measurements of UTLS humidity have therefore relied on in-situ research instrumentation, either balloon-borne or aircraft-borne. Aircraft and large balloons are expensive and cannot provide a proper climatology for water vapour, and the long sequence of NOAA frost-point hygrometer profiles do so only in one location (Boulder). This project seeked to develop a small, relatively cheap package to measure water vapour and ozone in the region around the tropopause. The measurement phase of the project consisted of four month-long campaigns, for June, September and December 2001 and March 2002. An average of three flights a week were conducted during these periods - a total of 48 flights. These flights were targeted as far as possible, at different air masses in the lower stratosphere over Aberystwyth, with a particular emphasis on north-westerly jet streams. Forecast charts have been used to identify suitable conditions (350 K potential vorticity forecasts from ECMWF were available from NILU, Norway for 1 and 2 days ahead).