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meteorology

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  • Data were collected by various stations around the globe, not covered by other datasets within this collection, and cover the period from 1900 until 2000. These data are the Met Office's 'old' Land Surface Observation data and have been superseded by the MIDAS dataset collection. This dataset remains for historic purposes only. The data contain measurements of hourly and daily meteorological values, such as rainfall, sunshine duration, temperature, and wind speed. The MIDAS dataset supersedes this dataset and new users should apply for access to that by following the on-screen instructions. If necessary, you will be able to access this historic dataset once you have been granted access to the MIDAS data. The dataset contains the measurements of the following parameters: Sunshine duration Snow depth Visibility Wind speed and wind direction Temperature Cloud type Past and present weather

  • The Campbell Scientific PWS100 present weather sensor deployed at the Chilbolton Observatory, Hampshire, detects and classifies precipitation by observing the scattering of a laser beam 20 degrees off the forward direction in the horizontal and vertical planes. The detected signals depend on the size, shape, optical properties, concentration and velocity of the particles. The instrument is mounted approximately 10m above ground on the roof of a cabin at the Chilbolton Observatory site. It is operated continuously. Data include: counts as a function of size of hydrometeors in 300 bins from 0.1 to 30.0 mm, the number of hydrometeors in 9 type categories. visibility, air temperature, relative humidity, rainfall rate, rainfall accumulation, average hydrometeor velocity, average hydrometeor size and reports the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) present weather code for the site. Data are archived as netCDF files.

  • Data were collected by stations at Ascension Island, the Falkland Islands, and St Helena, in the South Atlantic from 1900 until 2000. These data are the Met Office's 'old' Land Surface Observation data and have been superseded by the MIDAS dataset collection. This dataset remains for historic purposes only. The data contain measurements of hourly and daily meteorological values, such as rainfall, sunshine duration, temperature, and wind speed. The MIDAS dataset supersedes this dataset and new users should apply for access to that by following the on-screen instructions. If necessary, you will be able to access this historic dataset once you have been granted access to the MIDAS data. The dataset contains the measurements of the following parameters: Sunshine duration Snow depth Visibility Wind speed and wind direction Temperature Cloud type Past and present weather

  • Data from the Armagh Observatory, founded in 1790 by Archbishop Richard Robinson. There are around 25 astronomers who are actively studying Stellar Astrophysics, the Sun, Solar System astronomy, and the Earth's climate. As well as astronomical observations various meteorological parameters have been recorded since 1794. The data held at the BADC are daily, mean monthly and seasonal and annual maximum and minimum temperatures from 1844, the 1m and 30 cm depth soil temperatures since 1904, precipitation since 1838 and sunshine daily and mean data produced by Armagh Observatory. If users wish to find data from other areas of work undertaken by the observatory they should visit the Armagh Observatory website.

  • The Airborne Antarctic Ozone Experiment (AAOE) aimed to study chemical composition and physical parameters in the Antarctic during the development of the Antarctic Ozone Hole in August and September 1987. The data is primarily that collected onboard the NASA ER-2 and DC-8 aircraft, along with ozonesonde data collected at four Antarctic stations: Halley Bay, McMurdo, Palmer Station, and the South Pole. The experiment tested the chemical and dynamical theories of the ozone hole using the aircraft data in theoretical computer models of the chemistry and dynamics of the stratosphere. The data include atmospheric composition, meteorological parameters, aerosol data and cloud data. The NASA ER-2 is a high altitude research aircraft that sampled air at those altitudes where the ozone hole was at its most intense, with data gathered on the air mass within the confines of the hole itself. The ER-2 collected information on three-dimensional winds, pressure, temperature, temperature profiles +/- 1 km from flight level, chlorine monoxide, bromine monoxide, ozone, nitric oxide, reactive nitrogen, total water, nitrous oxide, whole air sampling, condensation nuclei, aerosol size distribution and composition, and cloud particle images and sizes. The DC-8 aircraft flew at the lowermost extremities of the hole and deployed a combination of remote sounding of the overlying atmosphere with some in situ sampling. Vertical distributions of ozone and aerosols above the cruising altitude of the aircraft and within the hole were mapped. The DC-8 collected ozone and aerosol profiles overhead by LIDAR; and measured ozone, bromine oxide, OClO, nitrogen dioxide, nitric acid, and hydrogen chloride. In situ methods yielded ozone, total water, and whole air sampling.

  • The UK Colonial Registers and Royal Navy Logbooks (CORRAL) project uses late 18th to early 20th century archive material to enhance the global coverage of daily to sub-daily weather observations by digitising Royal Navy ship's logbooks (from ships of voyages of scientific discovery and those in the service of the Hydrographic Survey) and coastal and island records contained in UK Colonial documents. This provides meteorological recordings from marine sites back to the 18th Century. These data are public. These records are held at The National Archive, Kew. The ADM section includes records of the Admiralty, Naval Forces, Royal Marines, Coastguard, and related bodies, concerning all aspects of the organisation and operation of the Royal Navy and associated naval forces, over the period 1205-1998 (more details are available in the National Archives catalogue entry). The CORRAL project deals with the following series: ADM51: Admiralty: Captains' Logs, 1669-1853 ADM53: Admiralty: and Ministry of Defence, Navy Department: Ships' Logs 1799-1985 [Excluding Flying Squadron] ADM53 -- Flying Squadron: Admiralty: and Ministry of Defence, Navy Department: Ships' Logs 1869-1872 ADM55: Admiralty: Supplementary Logs and Journals of Ships on Exploration, 1757-1861; 1904, including logs from the voyages of James Cook.

  • Data were collected by UK stations from 1853 until 2000. These data are the Met Office's 'old' Land Surface Observation data and have been superseded by the MIDAS dataset collection. This dataset remains for historic purposes only. The data contain measurements of hourly and daily meteorological values, such as rainfall, sunshine duration, temperature, and wind speed. The MIDAS dataset supersedes this dataset and new users should apply for access to that by following the on-screen instructions. If necessary, you will be able to access this historic dataset once you have been granted access to the MIDAS data. The dataset contains the measurements of the following parameters: Sunshine duration Snow depth Visibility Wind speed and wind direction Temperature Cloud type Past and present weather

  • This dataset contains wind speed and direction, pressure, temperature and humidity measurements for the Kirby Misperton site. British Geological Survey (BGS), the universities of Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool, Manchester and York and partners from Public Health England (PHE) and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), are conducting an independent environmental baseline monitoring programme near Kirby Misperton, North Yorkshire and Little Plumpton, Lancashire. These are areas where planning permission has been granted for hydraulic fracturing. The monitoring allows the characterisation of the environmental baseline before any hydraulic fracturing and gas exploration or production takes place in the event that planning permission is granted. The investigations are independent of any monitoring carried out by the industry or the regulators, and information collected from the programme will be made freely available to the public.

  • The Coastal Air Pollution (CAP) field campaigns in 2009 and 2010 (CAP-2009 and CAP-2010 respectively) sought to investigate the impact of local meteorology on coastal air quality and the structure and evolution of the coastal boundary layer. This dataset contains vertical profiles of horizontal and vertical wind components as well as signal-to-noise (SNR) and spectal width measurements which were collected at the Weybourne Atmospheric Observatory, Norfolk, between September 2009 and April 2010. These data were collected by the Facility for Ground-based Atmospheric Measurements' (FGAM) 1290 MHz Mobile Wind Profiler, owned and operated by the University of Manchester and formerly known as the aber-radar-1290mhz. The data are available at 15 minute intervals as netCDF files to all registered British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC) users.

  • The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS) was the first major element in NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. It was designed to make a systematic study of the stratosphere and provide new data on the mesosphere and thermosphere. The satellite was launched on 12th September 1991. This dataset contains standard data concerning stratospheric temperature, geopotential height and wind components produced by the upper atmosphere research satellite data assimilation system at the UK Met Office. The data assimilation system is a development of the scheme used at the Met Office for operational weather forecasting, which has been extended to cover the stratosphere. The primary product is a daily analysis (at 1200 UTC) which is produced using operational observations only. For short periods of particular interest the analyses are available at 6-hourly intervals. Assimilation experiments using UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) data in addition to operational meteorological observations have been carried out for limited periods.