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  • These spatial layers contain the predicted occurrence and abundance of three heathland shrubs, Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Vaccinium myrtillus and Vaccinium vitis-idaea identified as susceptible host species for Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in Scotland. The distribution models were developed from quadrat vegetation data kindly provided by Scottish Natural Heritage combined with data on climate and soil conditions as well as deer abundance and were fitted using a Bayesian Generalised Mixed Modelling approach adapted for input data on the DOMIN scale. This research was funded by the Scottish Government under research contract CR/2008/55, 'Study of the epidemiology of Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora kernoviae in managed gardens and heathlands in Scotland' and involved collaborators from St Andrews University, Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture (SASA), Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH), Forestry Commission, the Food and Environment Research Agency (FERA) and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5749df3d-000c-445e-a37f-dc0763b4d5ec

  • The dataset consists of long-term vegetation monitoring data from the Hard Hill burning plots sited in the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve, Cumbria. An experiment to investigate the effects of rotational burning and grazing was initiated in 1954, consisting of a replicated block layout. Initial vegetation recording was carried out in 1961 and 1965 using a quadrat method and DOMIN scale. In 1972 onwards, vegetation was recorded using a pin frame. Data were recorded by staff from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and its predecessors. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0b931b16-796e-4ce4-8c64-d112f09293f7