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  • Sediment % coarse fraction (>63 microns), and abundance of fish teeth in coarse fraction. 2016 has been a record breaking year in terms of global temperatures. The high temperatures have resulted from a combination of elevated atmospheric pCO2 coupled with the global impacts of a strong El Nino event. There are many important components of the climate system, and the El Nino phenomenon demonstrates the importance of the low latitude Pacific Ocean. The warm pool of water in the western Pacific Ocean has not always had the same characteristics as it has today, and it has been proposed that its evolution over the past 15 million years has had a major impact on global climate. In order to understand how the warm pool might respond to future climate change, it is important to understand the drivers behind its past evolution. Did it respond simply to the changing shape of ocean basins through time? Or did it respond to other components of the climate system, such as sea level or latitudinal temperature gradients? The changes in warm pool structure may also have impacted the biological ecosystems, and hence the cycling of carbon in this region. The carbon cycle is another key component of the Earth's climate system. Understanding the causes and consequences of these long-term changes in the Pacific warm pool requires a two-pronged approach, using modelling in conjunction with proxy records for different parts of the climate system. This proposal aims to generate some key records of past high latitude temperature and ice volume that can be directly compared with changes in the warm pool through time. These records will be derived from geochemical analyses of microscopic marine fossils collected by the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP).

  • Major, trace element and REE analyses of muds and mudstones from selected intervals from all of the holes. Location of the drill holes are given in the Exp. 352 cruise report (Reagan et al)

  • Data collected as part of the NERC funded Radioactivity and the Environment (RATE), Long-lived Radionuclides in the Surface Environment (Lo-RISE), research consortium.This data comes from the marine workstream group based at the Scottish Universities Environmental Research Centre (SUERC) and the Scottish Association for Marine Science (SAMS). The data consists of radionuclide measurements of environmental and biological samples including radiocarbon, caesium (137), americium (241) and plutonium (238, 239, 240).The data has been published in the following publications: Tierney et al., 2018. Modelling Marine Trophic Transfer of Radiocarbon (14C) from a Nuclear Facility. Ecosystem Modelling and Software 102, 138-154. Tierney et al., 2017. Nuclear Reprocessing-Related Radiocarbon (14C) Uptake into UK Marine Mammals. Marine Pollution Bulletin 124, 43-50. Muir et al., 2017. Ecosystem Uptake and Transfer of Sellafield-Derived Radiocarbon (14C). Part 1: The Irish Sea. Marine Pollution Bulletin 114, 792-804. Tierney et al., 2017. Ecosystem Uptake and Transfer of Sellafield-Derived Radiocarbon (14C). Part 2: The West of Scotland. Marine Pollution Bulletin 115, 57-66 Tierney et al., 2016. Accumulation of Sellafield-derived 14C in Irish Sea and West of Scotland Intertidal Shells and Sediments. Journal of Environmental Radioactivity 151, 321-327.

  • The potential for leakage of CO2 from a storage reservoir into the overlying marine sediments and into the water column and the impacts on benthic ecosystems are major challenges The potential for leakage of CO2 from a storage reservoir into the overlying marine sediments and into the water column and the impacts on benthic ecosystems are major challenges associated with Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in subseafloor reservoirs. To investigate the consequences of CO2 leakage for the marine environment, a field-scale controlled CO2 release experiment was conducted in shallow, unconsolidated marine sediments. Changes of the chemical composition of the sediments, their pore waters and overlying water column were monitored before, during and up to 1 year after the 37-day long CO2 release from May 2012 to May 2013. In particular this focused on changes in the solid phase (physical properties, major and minor elemental composition, inorganic and organic carbon content), the pore water chemical composition (cations, anions, nutrients and the carbonate system parameters total alkalinity, dissolved inorganic carbon and isotopic signature of DIC) and the water column chemical composition (oxygen, nutrients, total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon). This dataset was collected by the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) under the program QICS (Quantifying and monitoring environmental impacts of geological carbon storage) which was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), with support from the Scottish Government. The results are contained in an Excel file. QICS project website: www.bgs.ac.uk/qics/home.html. Lichtschlag et al. (2014) Effect of a controlled sub-seabed release of CO2 on the biogeochemistry of shallow marine sediments, their pore waters, and the overlying water column, http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1750583614003090 (doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.10.008).

  • The BGS Seabed Sediments 250k dataset is vector data is vector data which reflects the distribution of seabed substrate types of the UK and some of its adjacent waters at 1:250,000 scale. This comprehensive product provides a digital compilation of the paper maps published by BGS at the same scale, as well as, additional re-interpretations from regional geological studies. The seabed is commonly covered by sediments that form a veneer or thicker superficial layer of unconsolidated material above the bedrock. These sediments are classified based on their grain size reflecting the environment in which were deposited. This information is important to a range of stakeholders, including marine habitat mappers, marine spatial planners, offshore industries (in particular, the dredging and aggregate industries). This dataset was primarily based on seabed grab samples of the top 0.1 m, combined with cores, dredge samples and sidescan sonar acquired during mapping surveys since the early 1970s. The variations in data density will be reflected in the detail of the mapping.

  • The Marine Photographs Archive held by BGS includes photographs of hydrocarbon well and (non-hydrocarbon) marine boreholes, cores and other samples. There are also photographs of the seabed and survey operations. The photos are primarily for the UKCS (United Kingdom Continental Shelf) and surrounding areas and date from the 1970s onwards. The photographs, which are a mix of prints, negatives and digital are applicable to a wide range of uses including environmental, geotechnical and geological studies. There are also some x-rays of cores.

  • Data are either (1) depths and spacings between stylolites and faults within Unit IV, (2) images from IODP drill core image logs of the locations of samples observed, (3) photomicrographs and flatbed thin section scans of thin sections cut from samples, (4) SEM BSE or EDS data collected at Cardiff University. These data form the basis of: Leah et al. "Brittle-ductile strain localisation and weakening in pelagic sediments seaward of the Hikurangi margin, New Zealand", Tectonics, Submitted. Images and data from samples collected at IODP Expedition 375 Site U1520 (38°58.1532'S, 179°7.9112'E, 3522.1 mbsl). This is just seaward (east) of the trench of the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand.

  • Geochemical data for the upper 300cm of giant piston core MD04-2832. Core MD04-2832 was collected from the middle basin of Loch Sunart a fjord on the west coast of Scotland from the research vessel Marion Dufresne on the 15th of June 2004. This data resource includes five data sheets: (1) Geochemical data, (2) Bulk radiocarbon, (3) ICP-MS, (4) FRUITS and (5) Age Model. 1. Geochemical data sheet includes Bulk elemental data (Organic Carbon, Nitrogen, C/N ratio, N/C ratio), Isotopic data (δ13C and ẟ15N), Biomarker data (Alkanes, Fatty Acids, GDGT's) and thermosgravimetric data (% labile, recalcitrant and refractory organic matter). 2. Bulk Radiocarbon data sheet includes bulk radiocarbon data for ten sediment samples presented as % modern, 14C Age (years BP), ẟ14C and Δ14C. 3. ICP-MS data sheet includes metal data associated with mining activities within the fjords catchment. Data includes Zinc (Zn), Lead (Pb), Copper (Cu), Barium (Ba), Aluminium (Al) and elemental ratios of these metal normalized with Al concentrations. 4. The FRUITS data sheet contains the outputs from the FRUITS Bayesian isotopic mixing model (Fernandes et al., 2014) used to constrain the source (terrestrial vs marine) of the organic carbon found at site MD04-2832. The model used bulk elemental ratios (N/C), Isotopic (δ13C and ẟ15N) and biomarker data (GDGT - BIT Index) to calculate the terrestrial and marine OC fraction from each downcore sample. 5. The Age Model datasheet contains the age model produced by the BACON software package (Blaauw and Christen, 2011). The age model was developed with a combination of shell/foraminifera radiocarbon dates and radiometric dating (210Pb and 137Cs). Further details on the data can be found in Smeaton, C., Cui, X., Bianchi, T.S., Cage, A.G., Howe J.A., Austin, W.E.N., (2021), The evolution of a coastal carbon store over the last millennium, Quaternary Science Reviews.