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  • The Ancient Biomolecules Initiative is a Natural Environment Research Council programme exploring the biomolecular record of past life which is entombed in archaeological and geological deposits. The findings have applications in archaeology, anthropology, forensic science, research into the past climates and oil exploration. This resource consists of a series of leaflets in PDF format which describe the key findings of the Ancient Biomolecules Initiative.

  • The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) is one of the ten instruments on board the Envisat satellite launched on the 28th of February 2002 from Kourou (French Guyana) and operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). MERIS is a 68.5 deg field-of-view nadir-pointing imaging spectrometer which measures the solar radiation reflected by the Earth in 15 spectral bands (visible and near-infrared). It obtains a global coverage of the Earth in 3 days. Its main objective is to measure the sea colour and quantify the ocean chlorophyll content and sediment, thus providing information on the ocean carbon cycle and thermal regime. It is also used to derive the cloud top height, cloud optical thickness, aerosol and water vapour column. The ground spatial resolution of the instrument is 260 m x 290 m. Only reduced resolution data (1.04 km x 1.16 km) are archived at the NEODC. This dataset contains Level 1B reprocessed radiances MERIS product.

  • The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) is one of the ten instruments on board the Envisat satellite launched on the 28th of February 2002 from Kourou (French Guyana) and operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). MERIS is a 68.5 deg field-of-view nadir-pointing imaging spectrometer which measures the solar radiation reflected by the Earth in 15 spectral bands (visible and near-infrared). It obtains a global coverage of the Earth in 3 days. Its main objective is to measure the sea colour and quantify the ocean chlorophyll content and sediment, thus providing information on the ocean carbon cycle and thermal regime. It is also used to derive the cloud top height, cloud optical thickness, aerosol and water vapour column. The ground spatial resolution of the instrument is 260 m x 290 m. Only reduced resolution data (1.04 km x 1.16 km) are archived at the NEODC. This dataset contains Level 2 retrieved parameters MERIS product.

  • The Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) is one of the ten instruments on board the Envisat satellite launched on the 28th of February 2002 from Kourou (French Guyana) and operated by the European Space Agency (ESA). MERIS is a 68.5 deg field-of-view nadir-pointing imaging spectrometer which measures the solar radiation reflected by the Earth in 15 spectral bands (visible and near-infrared). It obtains a global coverage of the Earth in 3 days. Its main objective is to measure the sea colour and quantify the ocean chlorophyll content and sediment, thus providing information on the ocean carbon cycle and thermal regime. It is also used to derive the cloud top height, cloud optical thickness, aerosol and water vapour column. The ground spatial resolution of the instrument is 260 m x 290 m. Only reduced resolution data (1.04 km x 1.16 km) are archived at the NEODC. This dataset collection contains Level 1B radiances and Level 2 retrieved parameters products from 2002-2012.

  • We present here the land cover classification across West Antarctica and the McMurdo Dry Valley produced from Landsat-8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images of six proglacial regions of Antarctica at 30 m resolution, with an overall accuracy of 77.0 % for proglacial land classes. We conducted this classification using an unsupervised K-means clustering approach, which circumvented the need for training data and was highly effective at picking up key land classes, such as vegetation, water, and different sedimentary surfaces. This work is supported by the Leeds-York-Hull Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) Doctoral Training Partnership (DTP) Panorama under grant NE/S007458/1. The Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic project VAN 1/2022 and the Czech Antarctic Foundation funded fieldwork that contributed to part of this work.