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  • The Land Survey Plans collection of c.1,520 plans consists largely of mine plans acquired by the Survey, including 492 non-coal mine plans deposited by the National Coal Board 1984-87, and copies of mine plans derived from various sources including '6-inch reductions'. The collection also contains about 500 miscellaneous plans extracted from other Land Survey records in order to benefit from specialised systems of archival storage. The Survey's collection of Northern England mine plans are being added to the LSP collection. The collection supplements the Plans Of Abandoned Mines (Other than Coal & Oil Shale) in Scotland (NONCOALPLANSCO) providing an index to plans other than coal and oil shale for Scotland. Indexed on BGS Plans Database Index. Coal Authority hold some non-coal plans for Scotland. All non-confidential data held by NGRC(N) is available to users. Mainly coalfield areas of Central Scotland.

  • The data deposit includes results from 12 experiments that reacted carbon dioxide, seawater and limestone as a method of CO2 sequestration (as xlsx files). The data were obtained by Dr Huw Pullin, Cardiff University as part of a UKRI funded research project. Experiments were conducted under controlled temperatures (20degC), and CO2 pressures (5 and 50% v/v at 1 atm). The methods used are described in Xing et al., 2022 Chemical Engineering Journal. 431. 134096 DOI: 10.1016/j.cej.2021.134096

  • The collection comprises photographic half plate black & white negative and 35mm colour transparency copies of plans of mine workings for haematite, gypsum, limestone, baryte and metalliferous minerals for Cumbria dating from 1872 onwards. The plans were originally deposited in compliance with the Coal and Metalliferous Mines Regulation acts. The original plans are currently held by Cumbria County Record Office on behalf of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) and total about 1240 plans. No digital index is available but a paper catalogue is provided by the Health & Safety Executive. As the collection relates to plans of mines abandoned after the 1872 Act, the holdings are fairly complete after this date. Note however, that the Metalliferous Mines Act originally applied only to mines employing more than 12 men, (eg. some limestone mines). Coal Authority may hold non-coal mine plans not covered by Mine Abandonment Plan collection.

  • A laboratory µ-CT scanner was used to image the dissolution of Ketton, Estaillades, and Portland limestones in the presence of CO2-acidified brine at reservoir conditions (10 MPa and 50 °C) at two injected acid strengths for a period of 4 h. Each sample was scanned between 6 and 10 times at ~4 µm resolution and multiple effluent samples were extracted. See also paper: H.P. Menke et al. Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 204 (2017) 267-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.gca.2017.01.053.

  • This dataset contains 10 three dimensional x-ray tomographic images of CO2-acidified brine reacting with Ketton limestone at a voxel size of 3.8 microns. It includes the unreconstructed projections (.txrm), the reconstructed images (.txm), and the masked and cropped segmented images (.am and .raw). The rock was imaged during dissolution 10 times over the course of 2.5 hours. Details can be found in Menke et al., 2015 in the journal Environmental Science and Technology.

  • We investigated the physical basis of this weakened trapping using pore scale observations of supercritical CO2 in mixed-wet carbonates. The wetting alteration induced by oil provided CO2-wet surfaces that served as conduits to flow. In situ measurements of contact angles showed that CO2 varied from nonwetting to wetting throughout the pore space, with contact angles ranging 25° <θ< 127°; in contrast, an inert gas, N2, was nonwetting with a smaller range of contact angle 24° <θ< 68 °. Observations of trapped ganglia morphology showed that this wettability allowed CO2 to create large, connected, ganglia by inhabiting small pores in mixed-wet rocks. The connected ganglia persisted after three pore volumes of brine injection, facilitating the desaturation that leads to decreased trapping relative to water-wet systems. This data is associated with this open access publication: Environ. Sci. Technol. 2016, 50, 18, 10282-10290. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.6b03111.

  • This dataset contains raw experimental triaxial testing data as outlined in "Castagna, A., Ougier‐Simonin, A., Benson, P. M., Browning, J., Walker, R. J., Fazio, M., & Vinciguerra, S. (2018). Thermal damage and pore pressure effects of the Brittle‐Ductile transition in Comiso limestone. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 123(9), 7644-7660.s, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2017JB015105". The data is provided in a .zip folder containing the files of 16 experiments that are accompanied by a README file for introduction. Files format is Microsoft Excel Worksheet (.xlsx) and data are tabulated. Each file contains the corresponding relevant sample’s details, and each column of data is clearly labelled, units included. For each experiment, time, radial and axial pumps volume displacements and pressures, top and bottom pore fluid pumps volume displacements and pressures, internal temperature, LVDT signals were recorded. Twenty right cylindrical samples of ‘Comiso’ limestone (Ragusa Formation; Sicily) were tested in triaxial compression at a range of confining pressures simulating depths of 290 m, 620 m, 1.2 km, and 2.0 km respectively, assuming an average density of the over-burden load of 2470 kg/m3. Prior to strength test, each sample was either oven dried (ca. 12 hours at 85 °C followed by cooling in a desiccator for 1 hour) or water saturated (samples in distilled water under vacuum for 24 hours). A subset of these samples has also been thermally treated at 150, 300, 450 and 600oC to induce thermal cracking prior to the mechanical testing. All tests were conducted at 10-5 s-1 axial strain rate in assumed drained conditions when relevant, and at room temperature. For saturated tests, the initial loading was applied in two steps, first by increasing Pc hydrostatically (σ1=σ2=σ3) until the desired confining pressure was reached, and then introducing pore fluid pressure, as per the functionality of the experimental set-up. The experiments were conducted by Drs A. Castagna, M. Fazio and P. Benson using the Snachez triaxial cell at the Rock Mechanics Laboratory of the University of Portsmouth. All responsible for the collection and initial interpretation of the data. Only 17 experiments are reported in this set of data; the missing 3 datasets are believed to be only available on the local computer storage of the triaxial apparatus used at that time.

  • This dataset contains raw experimental high temperature and acoustic emission testing data on ‘Comiso’ limestone samples as outlined in "Castagna, A., Ougier-Simonin, A., Benson, P. M., Browning, J., Walker, R. J., Fazio, M., & Vinciguerra, S. (2018). Thermal damage and pore pressure effects of the Brittle-Ductile transition in Comiso limestone. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 123(9), 7644-7660.s, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2017JB015105". The data is provided in a .zip folder for 2 experiments that are accompanied by a README file for introduction. Files format are Microsoft Excel Worksheet (.xlsx) and data are tabulated. Each file contains the corresponding relevant sample’s details and each column of data is clearly labelled, units included. For each experiment, local time, corrected time, temperature (in degrees Celsius), acoustic emission amplitude (in decibels) and counts were recorded. Cylindrical samples of ‘Comiso’ limestone samples (Ragusa Formation; Sicily) were heat-treated to investigate the effects of thermal stressing on the limestone’s microstructure. In all tests, a controlled heating rate of 1 °C/minute was applied, keeping the specimen at the desired maximum temperature for 30 minutes to allow complete temperature equilibration followed by natural cooling (generally less than<1 °C/minute). The experiments were conducted on the Carbolite CTF12/75/700 tube furnace of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory of the University College of London between the 22nd and 28th February, 2016. The experiment were conducted by Drs A. Castagna and J. Browning, both responsible for the collection and interpretation of the data.

  • Rare earth element, major and minor element, and iron speciation data for nine independent sections in the Nama Group, described in detail in Wood et al., 2015, Precambrian Research, and Tostevin et al., 2016, Nature Communications. Additional data for Zebra River section include sulfur isotopes from carbonate associated sulfate (published in Tostevin et al, 2017, Precambrian Research); Uranium isotope data for carbonates (published in Tostevin et al., 2019, EPSL); Calcium isotope data for carbonates (unpublished).

  • The collection comprises plans of mine workings for ironstone, fireclay, limestone, baryte and metalliferous minerals for Scotland dating from 1872 onwards deposited on abandonment of a mine in compliance with the coal and metalliferous mines regulation acts. The plans are held on behalf of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE) and total about 610 plans. Indexed in the BGS Plans Database Index. As the collection relates to plans of mines abandoned after the 1872 Act, the holdings are fairly complete after this date. The Metalliferous Mines Act originally applied only to mines employing more than 12 men, (eg. some limestone mines). Where non-coal minerals were worked with coal, the abandonment plans are retained by the Coal Authority. Coal Authority also holds exclusively non-coal mine plans not covered by Mine Abandonment Plan collection. All non-confidential data held by NGRC Edinburgh (National Geological Records Centre). Mainly coalfield areas of Central Scotland with large collection relating to the Leadhills-Wanlockhead mining district.