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  • The Landsat 8 mission was a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) which ensures the continued availability of Landsat data. This dataset collection contains moderate resolution images of the Earth’s surface in the visible to thermal infrared. Landsat 8 carries two science instruments: the Operational Land Imager (OLI) and the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS). The OLI provides measurements in the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared including a panchromatic band with 15 m spatial resolution and multispectral bands with 30 m spatial resolution. The TIRS provide a new infrared channel (band 9) for cirrus detection and a new deep blue band (band 1) for coastal monitoring. The TIRS instrument provides measurements at 100 m resolution in two bands in the thermal infrared previously covered by a single wide band. Some data from 2014 is now held by the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA).

  • UTLS-OZONE was a NERC directed mode programme funding projects to study the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The particular emphasis was on the processes determining the distribution of ozone and any subsequent climate impacts. Two UTLS Ozone projects were based on airborne campaigns using the FAAM aircraft, namely ITOP-UK and CIRRUS. This dataset contains ECMWF meteorological images.

  • This dataset contains cloud images from the NCAS Camera 12, one of two identical cameras (designated as ncas-cam-11 and ncas-cam-12), captured at various sites around the Magdalena Mountains, New Mexico, USA, as part of the Deep Convective Microphysics Experiment (DCMEX). DCMEX examined the formation and development of clouds over mountains during July and August 2022. These cameras were designed to take simultaneous images of the same object while placed a distance apart to create a stereo image, but this was not always possible; on some days only one camera was used or the two cameras were deployed in separate locations. The images from this camera were taken during the duration of the DCMEX campaign of clouds from a range of sites. These are accompanied by similar images from a sibling camera (see connected dataset). Where the two cameras were operated at the same site they were synchronised in terms of camera settings (exposure, etc) and camera pointing directions to facilitate the onward use of images as stereoscopic imagery. For those latter instances files have been marked with stereo-a or stereo-b within the filename to denote where the images form the left of right image for such images. Other images do not contain these additional filename fields to denote when the cameras were used in stand-along mode. Note, due to the nature of coordinating images between the two cameras one was designated as the primary camera from which the settings were then conveyed to the secondary camera by the coordinating software. As a result exact image synchronisation wasn't possible and thus the secondary camera image may have a timestamp that is a second or so later.

  • The Flood Action Team (FLoAT) project is intended to collate a variety of data collected during the June and July 2007 Flood events in the UK (e.g. Tewkesbury event in 2007). This project is funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) - project Ref. R8/H12/69 - through the Flood Risk for Extreme Events (FREE) NERC directed mode programme. Aerial images of the Tewkesbury area, which include the river Severn and the river Avon, were collected during the flood events of summer 2007.

  • This dataset contains cloud images from the NCAS Camera 11, one of two identical cameras (designated as ncas-cam-11 and ncas-cam-12) captured at various sites around the Magdalena Mountains, New Mexico, USA, as part of the Deep Convective Microphysics Experiment (DCMEX). DCMEX examined the formation and development of clouds over mountains during July and August 2022. These cameras were designed to take simultaneous images of the same object while placed a distance apart to create a stereo image, but this was not always possible; on some days only one camera was used or the two cameras were deployed in separate locations. The images from this camera were taken during the duration of the DCMEX campaign of clouds from a range of sites. These are accompanied by similar images from a sibling camera (see connected dataset). Where the two cameras were operated at the same site they were synchronised in terms of camera settings (exposure, etc) and camera pointing directions to facilitate the onward use of images as stereoscopic imagery. For those latter instances files have been marked with stereo-a or stereo-b within the filename to denote where the images form the left of right image for such images. Other images do not contain these additional filename fields to denote when the cameras were used in stand-along mode. Note, due to the nature of coordinating images between the two cameras one was designated as the primary camera from which the settings were then conveyed to the secondary camera by the coordinating software. As a result exact image synchronisation wasn't possible and thus the secondary camera image may have a timestamp that is a second or so later.