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  • Field photographs of rock formations or modern precipitates from the sedimentary environment. Samples were collected throughout the UK. This data was collected between February 2019 and November 2019. This data was collected to better understand the low temperature cycling of Telurium (Te) and Sellenium (Se) in the geological environment. For example, a range of ochre samples were included in this data. Ochres are a modern precipitate commonly found in rivers and streams which flow through geographical areas with a history of mining resources which are rich in sulphides. Iron from the sulphides are leached out and deposited downstream, coating river and stream beds, giving a red, yellow or orange colouration. Ochres can be a sink for trace metals such as Te and Se, therefore studying these environments could be informative from a resource perspective but also from an environmental hazard perspective. This data would be useful for researchers who require reference photographs for similar studies or as an aid for resampling.

  • The dataset contains carbon dioxide and methane emissions, as well as resorufin production (as a proxy for microbial metabolic activity) and dissolved oxygen concentrations, resulting from laboratory incubation experiments of streambed sediments. The sediments were collected from the upper 10 centimetres of the streambed in the River Tern and the River Lambourn in September 2015, with three samples collected from each river. These samples were collected from three areas: silt-dominated sediment underneath vegetation (fine), sand-dominated sediment from unvegetated zones (medium) and gravel-dominated sediment from unvegetated zones (coarse). The sediment was used in laboratory incubation experiments to determine the effect of temperature, organic matter content, substrate type and geological origin on streambed microbial metabolic activity, and carbon dioxide and methane production. The work was carried out as part of a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) funded PhD (NERC award number 1602135). The work was also part funded through the Seventh Framework Programme (EU grant number 607150). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3a0a5132-797c-4ed5-98b9-1c17eaa2f2b7

  • Mining hazard (not including coal) summarises the location, extent and indicates the level of hazard associated with former and present underground mine workings. The dataset covers Great Britain and is published at 1: 50 000 scale. The content is derived from a range of data sources including, but not limited to the bedrock geology, extensive literature reviews of both published and unpublished documents, abandonment and mine plans, combined with a wealth of expert knowledge and experience. The release of version 8 builds on the content of previously published versions. The coverage has been expanded with the inclusion of newly identified areas and drawing on data from the BGS published Britpits (BGS database of British Pits -includes both surface and underground mineral workings) and other resources. For the first time, zones of influence have been integrated (for evaporites, oil shales and building stones) to indicate the areas surrounding mining sites which might be impacted. The data have been compiled and presented in an easy to use format to provide a national overview of the country's mining legacy. Given the long and complex mining history of Great Britain, this dataset represents the best information available at the present time (September 2020). Work continues to develop this product, which will result in the release of ad hoc updates in the future.