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  • Vegetation surveys from 35 transects in 2005 and 34 transects in 2006, focusing on tree and shrub abundance and sizes, in Monks Wood National Nature Reserve (Cambridgeshire, England). The transects were located in occupied territories of Marsh Tits, and also unoccupied areas of the wood used as controls, in order to sample the birds' habitat. However, the surveys also provide representative and widespread sampling of the overall woodland. The surveys include all woody tree and shrub species, and also standing and fallen deadwood, in different size categories. Fieldwork was undertaken and supervised by the authors and funded by the Natural Environment Research Council's National Capability investment. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/65edb979-eebd-4331-94f6-52f0844fb3cb

  • This dataset contains first egg dates for great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) from Monks Wood, Brampton Wood and Wennington Wood in Cambridgeshire, England, over a 23 year period. The dataset runs from the breeding season in 1993 to the end of the breeding season in 2015. The first egg dates are presented as the number of days from the start date which was set as the 1st April each year. Because the timing of breeding of great tits and blue tits is influenced in large part by ambient temperature and the phenology of their main prey, the data were collected as a measure of spring phenology. These data comprise part of a larger long-term study of the influence of habitat (extent, structure and composition) and landscape factors on abundance, distribution and breeding success of woodland birds in English lowland deciduous woodland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2efa9bf4-e5c0-42f9-8fcb-90dca2bb9c66

  • This dataset contains counts of pollinators visiting different varieties of oilseed rape (OSR). Data were collected from four trial sites in the UK in May 2012. The trial sites comprised of 20 varieties (plots) replicated in three blocks on each farm but only 2 of the blocks at each site were used for pollinator observations. Pollinator observations were also only made where there were greater than 30 percent of OSR plants in flower in the plot and only when weather conditions were within standardised limits. For each plot per site a six minute observation period was made during which the number of pollinators within the following taxon groups were counted: bumblebees to the species level, solitary bees identified to general body forms (Lasiglossum to genus level; Osmia separated to bicolour and rufa; Andrena separated to body forms typical of dorsata, carantonica, nigroaenea, haemorrhoa, fulva, flavipies, nitida, cineraria, bicolour and minuta), large hoverflies (> 12 mm), small hoverflies (< 11 mm), and Bibionidae. Each variety was observed for two separate six minute periods to reduce the impacts of minor fluctuations in weather that may reduce pollinator observations within single six minute periods. The dataset was collected as part of a project which aimed to identify key pollinators for OSR and identify if there are feeding preferences for individual varieties. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/d7b25308-3ec7-4cff-8eed-fe20b815f964

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset contains first egg dates for great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) from Monks Wood, Brampton Wood and Wennington Wood in Cambridgeshire, England, over a 22 year period. The dataset runs from the breeding season in 1993 to the end of the breeding season in 2014. The first egg dates are presented as the number of days from the start date which was set as the 1st April each year. Because the timing of breeding of great tits and blue tits is influenced in large part by ambient temperature and the phenology of their main prey, the data were collected as a measure of spring phenology. These data comprise part of a larger long-term study of the influence of habitat (extent, structure and composition) and landscape factors on abundance, distribution and breeding success of woodland birds in English lowland deciduous woodland. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2024e114-6a7e-437d-b3a6-4929967eb1aa