Keyword

Calluna vulgaris

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From 1 - 9 / 9
  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset includes phenology (spring emergence) data from two of the dominant higher plant species in the experimental plots at the Climoor field site in Clocaenog Forest, NE Wales. Data includes shoot length extension and growth form for Calluna vulgaris, and shoot length, phenophase and location for Vaccinium myrtillus (please refer to supporting documentation for definitions). The data were recorded in 2000, 2002 and 2004. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/ef0bf96f-357b-4c7e-80e4-1a33903eecdf

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset includes measurements of photosynthesis for the dominant higher plant species in the experimental plots at the Climoor field site in Clocaenog Forest. Plant species included are Calluna vulgaris, Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum nigrum. Ambient light measurements are included as well as light response curve measurements. Data was collected infrequently between 2001-2003 for Calluna and Vaccinium, and just in 2001 for Empetrum. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f5e7e03c-ecf3-4455-8567-e1ad8daa66ee

  • This dataset contains vegetation survey data from an upland heath site in the Clocaenog Forest. This was done by pin point methodology, and data includes both pin hits as well as measurements converted into plant biomass (grammes per square metre). Vegetation was surveyed in the experimental plots at the Climoor site in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012. The vegetation at the site is a typical UK upland heathland, dominated by Calluna vulgaris, with Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum nigrum also being present in the vegetation understory. In each year, measurements were taken at a time period of maximum growth, which was late August/early September. Individual species can be examined, as well as the different components of the higher plants (i.e. leaf, stem, flower). Data was collected by CEH staff and PhD students trained in the use of the methods. Climoor is a climate change manipulation experiment that utilises automated roof technology to produce drought and warming experimental treatments that reflect climate change predictions for the next 20-30 years. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/5b39a644-d614-4f2b-8df6-202ed440b4ab

  • [THIS DATASET HAS BEEN WITHDRAWN]. This dataset includes vegetation chemistry data from the experimental plots at the Climoor field site in the Clocaenog Forest, NE Wales. It also includes data from material collected from outside, but nearby, the experimental plots. Both green and naturally senesced material was analysed between 1998 and 2010 (although not every year was included within this period). Where green material was analysed, only the current years growth was included in the sample. The dataset also includes analysis of different parts of the plants at the site, for example, Calluna vulgaris stems, Calluna vulgaris leaves. Plant species include Calluna vulgaris, Vaccinium myrtillus, Empetrum nigrum, Deschampsia flexuosa, Pleurozium schreberi. Determinants include carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, magnesium, lignin, tannin, alpha-cellulose and carbohydrates. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0e8a3212-3b7a-40b4-890b-4f6565aca87a

  • This dataset contains root length, biomass and fungal colonisation data for Calluna vulgaris from control, drought and warming treated soils from the long term climate change experiment in Clocaenog forest. Soil samples were collected from the climate change experiment in Northeast Wales during April 2015. Roots were separated from the soil, their length and biomass measured and then analysed using microscopy for Ericoid mycorrhizae (ErM) and dark septate endophyte (DSE) colonisation of Calluna vulgaris. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots, three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants growing season (March to September). The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes and has been running since 1999. The root length and fungal colonisation data aims to understand how changes in soil hydrological and chemical properties have influenced Calluna vulgaris rooting behaviour and interactions with the soil microbiome. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R016429/1 as part of the UK-SCAPE programme delivering National Capability. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/3d468857-f5d0-4dc4-88f3-6be6df19608b

  • This dataset provides photosynthesis data for the plant species Calluna vulgaris, Vaccinium myrtillus and Empetrum nigrum. Photosynthesis response curves were measured for Calluna vulgaris and Vaccinium myrtillus only. Photosynthesis was measured at the climate change field site Climoor which is located in Clocaenog forest, North East Wales. Photosynthesis measurements have been carried out in 2001, 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007; photosynthesis light response curves and Net Carbon Dioxide (CO2) assimilation rate (A), versus calculated substomatal CO2 concentration (Ci), (A/Ci), responses have been measured in 2002 and 2003. In 2005, the effects of drought on photosynthesis of all three species has been measured. In 2007, the effect climate change (warming and drought) has been measured on healthy, fungal affected and herbivory affected Vaccinium myrtillus leaves. The experimental field site consists of three untreated control plots, three plots where the plant canopy air is artificially warmed during night time hours and three plots where rainfall is excluded from the plots at least during the plants growing season (March to September). Photosynthesis measurements were carried out by trained members of CEH Bangor staff. The Climoor field experiment intends to answer questions regarding the effects of warming and drought on ecosystem processes. Plot level photosynthesis measurements are important to investigate ecosystem carbon dynamics and changes in the soil carbon under the imposed climatic treatments. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a17b3345-b769-426d-bccd-f3c8bd88dea1

  • This is a spatial dataset containing polygons representing areas of vegetation mapped within the Moor House National Nature Reserve in the northern Pennines, England. The map was created by staff of The Nature Conservancy in the 1960s. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/bb703113-3428-483c-858a-2a85cafd9821

  • The dataset consists of long-term vegetation monitoring data from the Hard Hill burning plots sited in the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve, Cumbria. An experiment to investigate the effects of rotational burning and grazing was initiated in 1954, consisting of a replicated block layout. Initial vegetation recording was carried out in 1961 and 1965 using a quadrat method and DOMIN scale. In 1972 onwards, vegetation was recorded using a pin frame. Data were recorded by staff from the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology and its predecessors. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/0b931b16-796e-4ce4-8c64-d112f09293f7

  • [This dataset is embargoed until June 1, 2022]. This dataset contains RGB photographs acquired from drone surveys. There are 741 harvest plots from 38 surveys at 36 sites around the world. Each site was approximately 1 ha in area. Included with the photographic images are the coordinates of ground control markers, biomass, taxonomic and location data for harvest plots and ancillary metadata. The observations can be used to obtain allometric size-biomass models. This work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council award number NE/R00062X/1 as part of the project 'Do dryland ecosystems control variability and recent trends in the land CO2 sink?' Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1ec13364-cbc6-4ab5-a147-45a103853424