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  • This dataset includes individual passive detector measurements of radon Rn-222 in the air of artificial burrows, Rn-222 measurements by instrumentation in soil gas of interstitial soil pores and burrow air, gamma analyses results for soil samples and, soil moisture and temperature data. Estimates of absorbed dose rates to wildlife from exposure to natural background radionuclides are required to put estimates of dose rates arising from regulated releases of radioactivity and proposed benchmarks into context. These data are from a study conducted at seven sites in northwest England (comprising broadleaved and coniferous woodlands, scrubland and pastures). Passive track etch detectors were used to measure the Rn-222 concentrations in artificial burrows over a period of approximately one year (July 2009 to June 2010). Instrumented measurements of burrow air and soil pore gas were also conducted in October 2009. The data result from a study funded by NERC-CEH and the England & Wales Environment Agency. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2641515F-5B76-445C-A936-1DA51BF365AD

  • The dataset contains three modelled estimates of global ammonia emissions from seabird colonies, at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees latitude/longitude. The model estimates were derived with a) detailed global seabird population data collated from a large number of sources (data sources date from 1980-2010 for different parts of the world) b) climate data (source: High-resolution Gridded Datasets, Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia, UK. http://www.cru.uea.ac.uk/cru/data/hrg/ last updated by Harris, I. (2007), date: 1995) c) emission model derived by Riddick et al. (2012) with funding for the project from the CEH Integrating Fund (NERC). A detailed description and discussion of the datasets, including methodology and uncertainties, can be found in the following peer-reviewed article: S. N. Riddick, U. Dragosits, T. D. Blackall, F. Daunt, S. Wanless and M. A. Sutton (2012) The global distribution of ammonia emissions from seabird colonies. Atmospheric Environment, 55 (2012), pp. 319-327 DOI: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2012.02.052 Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/c9e802b3-43c8-4b36-a3a3-8861d9da8ea9

  • Following the Fukushima accident in March 2011, grass samples were collected from 42 sites around Great Britain during April 2011. Iodine-131 was measurable in grass samples across the country with activity concentrations ranging from 10 to 55 Bq per kg dry matter. Concentrations were similar to those reported in other European countries. Rainwater and some foodstuffs were also analysed from a limited number of sites. Of these, I-131 was only detectable in sheep's milk (c. 2 Bq/kg). Caesium-134, which can be attributed to releases from the Fukushima reactors, was detectable in six of the grass samples (4-8 Bq/kg dry matter); 137Cs was detected in a larger number of grass samples although previous release sources (atmospheric weapons test and the 1986 Chernobyl and 1957 Windscale accidents) are likely to have contributed to this. All data and information for this sampling are available from this record. The data result from collaboration between CEH and the University of Stirling. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/1a91c7d1-ec44-4858-9af2-98d80f169bbd

  • Chemical composition of freshwater samples from sites in Northern England. Measurements of pH, dissolved major ions (Na, Mg, K, Ca, Cl, NO3, SO4), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved Al, Fe(II) and total Fe, and measurements of Al, Fe(II) and total Fe on samples following dialysis.

  • Data from analyses of addled and deserted sea eagle eggs collected by licensed collectors in Scotland. Contaminants reported include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides or their persistent metabolites, and a range of metals and metaloids. The white-tailed sea eagle has been re-introduced to a number of Scottish Islands since the 1980s. The Predatory Bird Monitoring Scheme (PBMS) is a long-term, national monitoring scheme that quantifies the concentrations of contaminants in the livers and eggs of selected species of predatory and fish-eating birds in Britain. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/72ed6237-aedf-43a7-b9e3-eef95320a2bb