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  • The data set describes the effects of three neonicotinoid seed treatments (clothianidin, thiamethoxam and a control) applied to winter sown oilseed rape in Hungary, Germany and the UK on honeybees (Apis mellifera). The data describes population responses in terms of European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) primary (colony strength and overwintering success) and secondary assessment endpoints for the response of honeybees to exposure to the neonicotinoids. Information on expression of neonicotinoids in the pollen and nectar from the crop or collected by bees is also included, as well as details of honeybee diseases and foraging preferences. This research was undertaken by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology in 2015 and was funded by Syngenta Ltd. and Bayer CropScience. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/eac530fe-54ad-4570-83d3-c59e70c0af9d

  • Data consists of abundance counts and diversity of pollinators collected in Ghana. Pollinators were sampled with pan-traps between August and November 2016 in 126 greenspaces spread over an urbanisation gradient and three management practices (amenity lands, farmed sites and informal greenspaces) around Sunyani and Techiman, Ghana. All insects were identified to order in the field. Samples were stored in 70% alcohol before being pinned for identification. Bees and wasps were pinned and differentiated with microscopy based on Goulet and Hubert (1993). Bees were subsequently identified with microscopy to morpho-species following Eardley, Kuhlmann and Pauly (2010). Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/2e245944-ee5b-4612-b866-cafa3a129270

  • Data comprise stable element concentrations in terrestrial Reference Animals and Plants (RAPs) and corresponding whole-body concentration ratios determined in two different Mediterranean ecosystems: a Pinewood and a Dehesa (grassland with disperse tree cover). The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) RAPs considered in the Pinewood ecosystem were Pine Tree and Wild Grass; whereas in the Dehesa ecosystem those considered were Deer, Rat, Earthworm, Bee, Frog, Duck and Wild Grass. The data include: elemental concentrations in soils; elemental concentrations in plants, invertebrates, vertebrate tissues and estimated concentrations for vertebrate whole-organisms; individual concentration ratios (relating the fresh matter concentration in organisms to the dry matter concentration in soil); vertebrate species tissue masses; fresh to dry matter data for invertebrate species; geometric and arithmetic mean and standard deviation summaries for elemental concentrations and concentration ratios. Elemental concentrations presented include I, Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, P, S, K. Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Cs, Ba, Tl, Pb and U. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/a1ab8c79-3426-43a4-ab42-6d1b218d1cc6

  • The dataset describes the functional effects traits derived for 57 taxonomic units (species, genus and family level classifications) of oilseed rape insect pollinators. This data provides information on both morphological and behavioural traits, typically at the species level, but also at a generic and functional group level. Data acquisition was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) under research programme NE/N018125/1 Achieving Sustainable Agricultural Systems (ASSIST). ASSIST is an initiative jointly supported by NERC and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC). Full details about this nonGeographicDataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/f09a0ada-b5c6-4dd9-9c7b-2fed23ab79b1

  • The number and type of pollinators in winter-sown oilseed rape fields (Brassica napus L.) in relation to local plant diversity (in crop and field margin) and landscape characteristics. Pollinators were collected using two methods (pan traps and transects). Local plant diversity was assessed using quadrats in field margins and in cropped area. The presence of hedges was also recorded. Landscape characteristics included the presence of patches of grassland of different biodiversity levels and the amount of grasslands and other semi natural habitat within a 0.5 - 3km radius circular buffer of the collection points. Data were collected over two years (2014-2015). These data were collected as part of Wessex BESS project, funded by the NERC Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability research program. This dataset can be used in conjunction with other Wessex BESS WP4 datasets. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/6128a4f7-d2ac-43c5-b492-af4c654e89b8

  • This dataset contains arthropod species presence and abundance data, species trait data and environmental data for arable reversion sites in southern England. A chronosequence of 52 arable grassland restoration sites and five target National Nature Reserve grassland communities were sampled for arthropods in 2014. These sites were located on calcareous soils. The majority of these sites were established as part of the South Downs Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA), South Wessex Downs ESA, as well as through subsequent agri-environmental schemes including Countryside Stewardship or Higher Level agri-environment. Restoration sites ranged in age (1 to 30 years), habitat quality (e.g. sward structure and floral similarity to target grasslands), management (cutting and grazing) and surrounding landscape (isolation and cover of grassland). This environmental variation was captured and is included in the data set. Arthropods were identified across a wide range of trophic groups (detrititvores, herbivores, predators and pollinators). For arthropod species identified to species, information on functional traits is derived, including body mass, dispersal ability and trophic group. Full details about this dataset can be found at https://doi.org/10.5285/78408af3-452f-41af-95f3-ffc13b05c232