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  • This dataset consists of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instrument on the 10th NOAA Sun-synchronous operational satellites (NOAA-10). NOAA-10 operated at an altitude of 833-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 0730, having been launched in November 1986. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from scanning radiometer on the NOAA-10 satellite. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational. This dataset is public, though NASA noted that this is intended for research purposes and the data has no commercial value.

  • This dataset consists of combined data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments on the Earth Radiaition Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the 10th NOAA Sun-synchronous operational satellites (NOAA-9). ERBS was launched in October 1984 by the Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41G) into an orbit at 603-km altitude, 57-deg. inclination. NOAA-10 operated at an altitude of 833-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 0730, having been launched in November 1986. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from scanning radiometers on the NOAA-10 ERBE satellites and for combined satellite cases. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset contains cloud top height product images from MSG satellites over Western Europe. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • The Icelandic Volcano, Eyjafjallajokull, started erupting on 14th April 2010. The volcanic ash cloud produced covered much of Northern Europe for several weeks causing extensive disruption to air travel. The UK and European atmospheric communities had many instruments - both airborne and ground-based, remote sensing and in-situ - taking measurements of the ash cloud throughout this period. This dataset contains measurements from Met Office's Laser Cloud Base Recorder (LCBR) network.

  • The Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites, operated by EUMETSAT (The European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites), provide almost continuous imagery to meteorologists and researchers in Europe and around the world. These include visible, infra-red, water vapour, High Resolution Visible (HRV) images and derived cloud top height, cloud top temperature, fog, snow detection and volcanic ash products. These images are available for a range of geographical areas. This dataset contains latest fog product images from MSG satellites over the UKV domain area. Imagery available from March 2005 onwards at a frequency of 15 minutes (some are hourly) and are at least 24 hours old.

  • This dataset consists of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instrument on the 9th NOAA Sun-synchronous operational satellites (NOAA-9). NOAA-9 operated at an altitude of 852-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 1430, having been launched in December 1984. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from scanning radiometer on the NOAA-9 satellite. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational. This dataset is public, though NASA noted that this is intended for research purposes and the data has no commercial value.

  • This dataset consists of combined data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments on the Earth Radiaition Budget Satellite (ERBS) and the 10th NOAA Sun-synchronous operational satellites (NOAA-9). ERBS was launched in October 1984 by the Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41G) into an orbit at 603-km altitude, 57-deg. inclination. NOAA-9 operated at an altitude of 852-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 1430, having been launched in December 1984. NOAA-10 operated at an altitude of 833-km, with an equatorial crossing local time of 0730, having been launched in November 1986. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from scanning radiometers on the NOAA-10 ERBE satellites and for combined satellite cases. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational.

  • This dataset consists of data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instrument on the NASA Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), launched from the Space Shuttle Challenger in October 1984 (STS-41G). ERBS was placed into an orbit at 603-km altitude, 57-deg. inclination. The ERBE instrument's main aim was to provide accurate measurements of incoming solar energy and shortwave and longwave radiation reflected or emitted from the Earth back into space. This dataset contains colour images (shortwave/longwave/net radiation, albedo, clear-sky albedo, clear-sky shortwave/longwave/net radiation, and shortwave/longwave/net cloud forcing) from the ERBE instrument, a scanning radiometer on ERBS. Monthly average values are included for the time periods during which the scanners were operational. This dataset is public, though NASA noted that this is intended for research purposes and the data has no commercial value.