Catalog

523 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 523
  • Manuscript notebooks, section books and field record cards containing detailed information gathered by the Survey geologists (or other recognised geologists) from various sources as part of the mapping process. Examples include observations linked directly to field slips, borehole logs, sections and drawings. Note: For the basic field mapping work notebooks have now been replaced by field record cards. Covering survey areas in Great Britain from 1840's to date.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names and rock type descriptions. The scale of the data is 1:10 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial with approximately 30% of England, Scotland and Wales available in the version 2 data release. BGS intend to continue developing coverage at this scale; current focus is to include all large priority urban areas, along with road and rail transport corridors. Superficial deposits are the youngest geological deposits formed during the most recent period of geological time, the Quaternary, which extends back about 2.58 million years from the present. They lie on top of older deposits or rocks referred to as bedrock. Superficial deposits were laid down by various natural processes such as action by ice, water, wind and weathering. As such, the deposits are denoted by their BGS lexicon name, which classifies them on the basis of mode of origin (lithogenesis) with names such as, 'glacial deposits', 'river terrace deposits' or 'blown sand'; or on the basis of their composition such as 'peat'. Most of these superficial deposits are unconsolidated sediments such as gravel, sand, silt and clay. The digital data includes attribution to identify each deposit type (in varying levels of detail) as described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme (volume 4). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • All type and figured calcareous microfossils and palynmorphs held in the BGS collections are registered using the prefix 'MPK'. To date MPK1 to 13400 have been used. Information includes name, locality, geological details and journal details.

  • A 1:250,000 map showing the main geological bedrock divisions in Northern Ireland. The bedrock shown on GeoIndex map comprises the bedrock geology, which represents the outcrops (at surface) and subcrops (at near-surface, beneath superficial deposits) in Northern Ireland. For each rock unit there is a brief generalised description showing the major rock group, rock type and age under the following headings. LEX_D: The name of the selected area. This can be a group, formation or igneous intrusion e.g. dyke. LEX_RCS: Map code as it appears on the published 1:250,000 map. RCS_D: The name of the dominant types of rock (lithologies) in the different areas shown on the map e.g. granite. The names of the rock types given here are often generalisations, appropriate for the large areas of geological coverage at this scale. These areas may include a number of different geological formations whose distribution can only be portrayed on more detailed geological maps. RANK: Identifies formations and groups. Min_Time_D and Max_Tim_D: The age of the rock unit in terms of periods, relatively smaller units of geological time e.g. Carboniferous, Jurassic etc. Some of the map areas include rocks with a range of ages and these are shown as such e.g. Triassic to Cretaceous. The oldest metamorphic rocks are described as Moinian and Dalradian. The rocks range in age from those deposited relatively recently, some 2 million years ago, back to ancient and highly altered Precambrian rocks over 2500 million years old. In broad terms the youngest rocks are found in the south and east of the UK, the oldest in the north and west. VERSION: Version of the data. RELEASED: Date of release/update of the data. CAUTION Because of the generalisation and simplification used in the compilation of this map, it should not be used to determine the detailed geology of any specific sites. It is best used to provide a basic understanding of the geology of the country in general, and for showing the geology of large regions where broad trends are more important than specific details. Persons interested in the detailed geology of particular sites should consult the latest large-scale maps or the Geological Survey of Northern Ireland at:- Geological Survey of Northern Ireland Colby House Stranmillis Court Belfast BT9 5BF

  • The World Magnetic Model (WMM), produced jointly with the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, is the standard model in UK Ministry of Defence and US Department of Defense navigation and attitude reference systems and is also used widely in civilian navigation systems. The model is also used on marine and aviation charts and is revised every five years.

  • The GeoSure data sets and reports from the British Geological Survey provide information about potential ground movement or subsidence in a helpful and user-friendly format. The reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available. GeoSure Basic is a single, combined GeoSure model, containing only the highest score of all the GeoSure layers. The model has been re-classified to negligible - very low, low and moderate - high. The methodology is based on the 6 GeoSure individual hazard Assessments. The storage formats of the data are ESRI and MapInfo but other formats can be supplied.

  • This document data set contains original prints, on paper, sepia or film, of seismic reflection survey location (navigation) maps. These provide the location data for the seismic sections of the Original Seismic Sections (ORIGSEISECS) and Copy Seismic Sections (COPYSEISECS) datasets. Almost all data are within the UK onshore area; although there are some UK near-shore and offshore (North Sea, Irish Sea) and foreign data. Most data were acquired for commercial hydrocarbon exploration and subsequently provided to BGS for use on specific projects. Some data were acquired by BGS and other public-sector bodies, e.g. BIRPS, for academic research. All maps are digitised upon receipt (see LOCSEC database) and then archived in this data set. (Copies used to be used for interpretation purposes but this is no longer the case.) Documents stored rolled in tubes. Approx 800 maps.

  • This layer of the Map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of available UTM (Universal Transverse Mercator) series 1:250000 geological maps. These maps display Bedrock, Quaternary (Superficial deposits) geology of the offshore areas and Seabed Sediments of the UK landmass and offshore regions. The different versions are normally published as separate maps for land areas, but these may be combined on a single map for offshore areas. Maps are normally available in flat and folded format. The UTM Series (Universal Transverse Mercator projection) maps cover an area of 1deg. latitude by 2deg. longitude.

  • This layer of the map based index (GeoIndex) shows the location of hydrocarbon wells known to BGS. Exploration for hydrocarbons by drilling began in the 19th century and locations were recorded in latitude/longitude until about 1960. These locations have been converted to national grid. The majority of the wells have formed part of basin studies by BGS and are therefore reliably located. There may be some discrepancies in location data between various databases, originating from project modifications and which original source was preferred.

  • **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. These hazards are evaluated using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The evaluated hazards are then linked to a postcode database - the Derived Postcode Database (DPD), which is updated biannually with new releases of Ordnance Survey Code-Point® data (current version used: 2019.3). The newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain (not including the Isle of Man). This product is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). The newGIP is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.