Catalog

523 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 523
  • These are the results obtained from an empirical test looking at the communicative effectiveness between two types of two dimensional (2D) map formats (Choropleth maps, and Cartograms) of the Greater London area of the United Kingdom. Participants were interviewed and observed individually during the procedure. The results contain the recorded measurements of spatial accuracy, and the time taken for each participant to answers 3 test questions. A post-test qualitative reaction of each participants' preference between the two map types is recorded, along with their gender, age, visual impediments, and self-assessed map reading ability.

  • The World Magnetic Model (WMM), produced jointly with the US National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's National Geophysical Data Center, is the standard model in UK Ministry of Defence and US Department of Defense navigation and attitude reference systems and is also used widely in civilian navigation systems. The model is also used on marine and aviation charts and is revised every five years.

  • Magnetograms are used to record variations in the Earth's magnetic field. Original paper magnetograms were recorded using photographic technqiues at Kew, Greenwich, Abinger, Hartland, Eskdalemuir and Lerwick Observatories. These magnetograms start in the 1840s and end in 1986 at which time digital recording of the magnetic field took over and magnetograms can be produced by computer graphic. The plots show variation in the Earth's magnetic field, typically over a 24-hour period.

  • **This dataset has been superseded. The latest version is newGeoSure Insurance Product version 8 2020.1** The newGeoSure Insurance Product (newGIP) provides the potential insurance risk due to natural ground movement. It incorporates the combined effects of the 6 GeoSure hazards on (low-rise) buildings: landslides, shrink-swell clays, soluble rocks, running sands, compressible ground and collapsible deposits. These hazards are evaluated using a series of processes including statistical analyses and expert elicitation techniques to create a derived product that can be used for insurance purposes such as identifying and estimating risk and susceptibility. The evaluated hazards are then linked to a postcode database - the Derived Postcode Database (DPD), which is updated biannually with new releases of Ordnance Survey Code-Point® data (current version used: 2019.3). The newGIP is provided for national coverage across Great Britain (not including the Isle of Man). This product is available in a range of GIS formats including Access (*.dbf), ArcGIS (*.shp) or MapInfo (*.tab). The newGIP is produced for use at 1:50 000 scale providing 50 m ground resolution.

  • Indexes and data records for Regional gravity observations on the UK mainland, Northern Ireland, offshore islands, tidal estuaries and seabed. Records include station identities, position, gravity reading and reduced gravity values. Most of the surveys were carried out by the BGS but the database includes data originally acquired by other organisations and subsequently given to the BGS to be managed as part of the national archive. Complete coverage of the UK mainland with a station density of 1-2 stations per square kilometre.

  • This data was produced to support a project looking at low permeability rocks in sub-Saharan Africa. Multiple boreholes were drilled for the project with geology identified from chippings. Groundwater chemistry was analysed from the resulting boreholes. The data contained within this record is from the CD that accompanies the report: J Davies and B É Ó Dochartaigh. 2002. Low Permeability Rocks In Sub-Saharan Africa. Groundwater development in the Tabora Region, Tanzania. British Geological Survey Internal Report, CR/02/191N. 71pp http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/505608/1/CR_02_191N.pdf The CD has not been uploaded in full elsewhere.

  • Registers of macrofossils in 127 volumes, covers the whole of the UK. Within each volume, data is arranged sequentially usually by collectors no. The data set began with the first Palaeontologist in the Geological Survey of Great Britain.

  • The 5km Hex GS Soluble Rocks dataset shows a generalised view of the GeoSure Soluble Rocks v7 dataset to a hexagonal grid resolution of 64.95km coverage area (side length of 5km). This dataset indicates areas of potential ground movement in a helpful and user-friendly format. The rating is based on a highest level of susceptibility identified within that Hex area: Low (1), Moderate (2), Significant (3). Areas of localised significant rating are also indicated. The summarising process via spatial statistics at this scale may lead to under or over estimation of the extent of a hazard. The supporting GeoSure reports can help inform planning decisions and indicate causes of subsidence. The Soluble Rocks methodology is based on the BGS Digital Map (DiGMapGB-50) and expert knowledge of the behaviour of the formations so defined. This dataset provides an assessment of the potential for dissolution within a geological deposit. Ground dissolution occurs when certain types of rock contain layers of material that may dissolve if they get wet. This can cause underground cavities to develop. These cavities reduce support to the ground above and can lead to a collapse of overlying rocks. Dissolution of soluble rocks produces landforms and features collectively known as 'karst'. Britain has four main types of soluble or 'karstic' rocks; limestone, chalk, gypsum and salt, each with a different character and associated potential hazards. Engineering problems associated with these karstic rocks include subsidence, sinkhole formation, uneven rock-head and reduced rock-mass strength. Sinkhole formation and subsidence has the potential to cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. Complete Great Britain national coverage is available.

  • Data identifying landscape areas (shown as polygons) attributed with geological names. The scale of the data is 1:25 000 scale. Onshore coverage is partial and BGS has no intention to create a national coverage at this scale. Areas covered are essentially special areas of 'classic' geology and include Llandovery (central Wales), Coniston (Lake District) and Cuillan Hills (Isle of Skye). Mass movement describes areas where deposits have moved down slope under gravity to form landslips. These landslips can affect bedrock, superficial or artificial ground. Mass movement deposits are described in the BGS Rock Classification Scheme Volume 4. However the data also includes foundered strata, where ground has collapsed due to subsidence (this is not described in the Rock Classification Scheme). Caution should be exercised with this data; whilst mass movement events are recorded in the data due to the dynamic nature of occurrence significant changes may have occurred since the data was released. The data should therefore be regarded as a snapshot in time (as at 2008). The data are available in vector format (containing the geometry of each feature linked to a database record describing their attributes) as ESRI shapefiles and are available under BGS data licence.

  • The dataset is based on a 1 hectare(ha) vector grid which covers the whole of England. It has been populated with a series of environmental and cultural assets, reflecting the presence or absence of an asset in an individual cell. The dataset has been designed to enable a single asset to be displayed in a generalised fomat; total numbers of assets within a given cell; or the opportunity to create in unique combination of the assets based on the generalised 1 ha data. The data is also available at 1km.