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  • The dataset comprises 105 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, during January - February 1995. The cruise, part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) Indian Special Survey (ISS01), worked stations in the Southern Indian Ocean - specifically in the Agulhas Basin, the Crozet Basin, the Natal Basin and the South West Indian Ridge. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the James Rennell Centre for Ocean Circulation as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE).

  • The dataset contains a diverse range of environmental data ranging from estuary properties including geomorphology, water depth and habitat characterisation to detailed time series of parameters such as salinity and chemical and nutrient concentrations. The data are stored in a database containing a directory of existing data sources for estuaries; data for the broad properties of 79 UK estuaries; and detailed hydrodynamic, bathymetric, and sedimentary information for six estuaries: Blackwater, Humber, Mersey, Ribble, Southampton Water and Tamar. The data range from 1965 to 2002 and include both historic datasets and those collected during a recent effort (1997-2002) to enhance our knowledge of estuaries. Data collection employed a variety of instrumentation and techniques, including water, biota and sediment sample collection and analysis and the deployment of hydrographic instruments such as sea level, temperature, salinity and optical backscatter recorders. The Estuaries Research Programme (ERP) began in 1997 with the EMPHASYS project, which aimed to improve our understanding of processes operating in estuaries and use this knowledge to enhance broad scale modelling techniques that can be applied to estuarine processes. This work was funded by the Environment Agency/Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Flood and Coastal Defence Research and Development Programme. The data are managed by the British Oceanographic Data Centre (BODC) and are available on CD-ROM.

  • The dataset comprises 58 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, within the North East Atlantic Ocean area. It incorporates the Rockall via Anton Dohrn (Ellett Line) section and further sections northwards - culminating in a section from off of the Butt of Lewis to 60N, 10W. The data were collected during April of 1981. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Scottish Marine Biological Association.

  • The dataset comprises 65 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the North East Atlantic Ocean (limit 40W) area specifically along the JONSIS standard section in the northern North Sea and along the standard Faroe Shetland Channel sections. The data were collected during May of 2001. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Fisheries Research Services Aberdeen Marine Laboratory as part of the Monitoring the Atlantic Inflow toward the Arctic (MAIA) project.

  • This dataset comprises hydrographic data profiles, collected by a salinity-temperature-depth (STD) sensor package, during July - August 1978. It incorporates casts performed within the North East Atlantic Ocean area, including the Rockall via Anton Dohrn (Ellett Line) section, and triangular surveys around each of the Joint Air Sea Interaction Experiment (JASIN) moorings NW of the Anton Dohrn Seamount. The data were collected by the Scottish Marine Biological Association.

  • The dataset comprises 220 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, from across the South West Atlantic Ocean area specifically transects around South Georgia and the South Sandwhich Islands, and casts from just above the Arctic Circle between Guevara Seamounts and Brategg Bank. The data were collected from November of 1981 to March of 1982. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the British Antarctic Survey as part of the Biological Investigations of Marine Antarctic Systems and Stocks (BIOMASS) programme.

  • This dataset comprises 23 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in July 1997 from stations off the coast of the Iberian Peninsula and in the English Channel. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the University of Liège Department of Astrophysics Geophysics and Oceanography as part of the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) II project.

  • This dataset contains a variety of hydrographic measurements including temperature, salinity, sound velocity, current speed/ direction and seismic data. Hydrographic profilers provided measurements of temperature, salinity, sound velocity and density. Four mooring stations were also installed as part of this project, with three minilogger chains providing temperature data and four moored ADCPs measuring current veloicty. The project ran from February 2006 to September 2009, however all of the data were collected between 17 April 2007 and 14 May 2007 during two cruises which took place in the Gulf of Cadiz. The research was conducted using two research vessels, the RRS Discovery (cruise D318) and the RV Poseidon (cruise PO350). The RRS Discovery cruise D318 was split into two legs, D318a, which took place between 17 April 2007 and 23 April 2007 and D318b, which took place between 29 April 2007 and 14 May 2007. For the second leg of cruise D318, the RRS Discovery was joined by the RV Poseidon. Hydrographic measurements were taken using a variety of instruments, including expendable bathythermographs (XBT), expendable CTDs (XCTD), conductivity-temperature depth (CTD) profilers, acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP) and VEMCO minilogger chains. Airguns and streamers were used in the recording of the seismic data. The main objectives of the Geophysical Oceanography (GO) project were A) To evaluate and improve new research methods in the developing field of seismic oceanography by exploiting the opportunity of two-ship operations between RSS Discovery and RV Poseidon and B) To study the internal wave field and mixing processes in the Gulf of Cadiz and demonstrate quantitative links between seismic and oceanographic measurements. The cruise was coordinated by Durham Univerity and funded under an EU grant as part of the Framework 6 NEST programme. Eight scientific institutions were involved in the project. These were: the University of Durham, the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory (POL), the Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (IFM-GEOMAR), the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER), the Italian National Agency for New Technologies, the Energy and Sustainable Economic Development (ENEA), the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), the University of Western Brittany and the University of Lisbon. Data from the programme are held at the British Oceanographic Data Centre.

  • This database, and the accompanying website called ‘SurgeWatch’ (http://surgewatch.stg.rlp.io), provides a systematic UK-wide record of high sea level and coastal flood events over the last 100 years (1915-2014). Derived using records from the National Tide Gauge Network, a dataset of exceedence probabilities from the Environment Agency and meteorological fields from the 20th Century Reanalysis, the database captures information of 96 storm events that generated the highest sea levels around the UK since 1915. For each event, the database contains information about: (1) the storm that generated that event; (2) the sea levels recorded around the UK during the event; and (3) the occurrence and severity of coastal flooding as consequence of the event. The data are presented to be easily assessable and understandable to a wide range of interested parties. The database contains 100 files; four CSV files and 96 PDF files. Two CSV files contain the meteorological and sea level data for each of the 96 events. A third file contains the list of the top 20 largest skew surges at each of the 40 study tide gauge site. In the file containing the sea level and skew surge data, the tide gauge sites are numbered 1 to 40. A fourth accompanying CSV file lists, for reference, the site name and location (longitude and latitude). A description of the parameters in each of the four CSV files is given in the table below. There are also 96 separate PDF files containing the event commentaries. For each event these contain a concise narrative of the meteorological and sea level conditions experienced during the event, and a succinct description of the evidence available in support of coastal flooding, with a brief account of the recorded consequences to people and property. In addition, these contain graphical representation of the storm track and mean sea level pressure and wind fields at the time of maximum high water, the return period and skew surge magnitudes at sites around the UK, and a table of the date and time, offset return period, water level, predicted tide and skew surge for each site where the 1 in 5 year threshold was reached or exceeded for each event. A detailed description of how the database was created is given in Haigh et al. (2015). Coastal flooding caused by extreme sea levels can be devastating, with long-lasting and diverse consequences. The UK has a long history of severe coastal flooding. The recent 2013-14 winter in particular, produced a sequence of some of the worst coastal flooding the UK has experienced in the last 100 years. At present 2.5 million properties and £150 billion of assets are potentially exposed to coastal flooding. Yet despite these concerns, there is no formal, national framework in the UK to record flood severity and consequences and thus benefit an understanding of coastal flooding mechanisms and consequences. Without a systematic record of flood events, assessment of coastal flooding around the UK coast is limited. The database was created at the School of Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton with help from the Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, the National Oceanography Centre and the British Oceanographic Data Centre. Collation of the database and the development of the website was funded through a Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) impact acceleration grant. The database contributes to the objectives of UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) consortium project FLOOD Memory (EP/K013513/1).

  • This dataset comprises 37 hydrographic data profiles, collected by a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor package, in June 2007 throughout Liverpool Bay. A complete list of all data parameters are described by the SeaDataNet Parameter Discovery Vocabulary (PDV) keywords assigned in this metadata record. The data were collected by the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory as part of the National Oceanography Centre (formerly the Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory), Liverpool Bay/Irish Sea Coastal Observatory initiative.