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From 1 - 10 / 806
  • This project will tackle one of the key technical challenges facing the development of commercially viable CO2 transport networks: modelling the phase behaviour of impure carbon dioxide, under the conditions typically found in carbon capture from power stations, and in high-pressure (liquid phase) and low-pressure (gas phase) pipelines. Models for phase behaviour are known as equations of state (EoS). EoS vary in their mathematical form, accuracy, region of validity and computational complexity. Because different applications have different requirements, there is no single EoS that is ideal for all applications. This project will use cutting-edge computer algorithms to automatically reparameterise EoS for CCS modelling. This flexible technique will allow a user to specify their requirements and re-derive model parameters matched to their needs. Our algorithms will directly produce functional forms for EoS from experimental data, thus fully automating the derivation of EoS. This will enable users to rapidly produce bespoke EoS that are tailored to their particular application, and will enable these models to continually evolve as new measurements become available, ensuring that experimental advances are rapidly converted into improved CCS modelling and, ultimately, better performance and efficiency of real CCS processes. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C1-22.

  • We used existing coretop samples from several sites from the Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans (Fig. 1 and Table S1) to test the relationship between Mg/Ca ratios and D47 values in modern foraminifera. In the North Atlantic the cores were the same as those used previously by Elderfield and Ganssen (2000) (Tables S1 and S2). Coretops with the potential to yield large (>5 mg) mono-specific samples of foraminifera were selected from the >300 lm size fraction of the sediment except for Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) where the >150 lm size fraction was chosen to obtain sufficient material. After cleaning the samples consisted of _3 mg of foraminiferal calcite and included 8 different species of surface- and deepdwelling planktonic foraminifera: Globigerina bulloides, Globigerinoides sacculifer, Globorotalia hirsuta, Globorotalia inflata, Globorotalia menardii, Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (s), and Orbulina universa. The Godwin Laboratory clumped isotope calibration (i.e., the regression between D47 and temperature) was established using natural cave carbonates that precipitated subaqueously at known temperatures, ranging from 3 to 47ºC (Table 1, Fig. 2). These carbonates grew under conditions that minimize CO2-degassing and evaporation and hence kinetic fractionation effects are negligible owing to an unlimited DIC pool in the water (Kele et al., 2015). All samples consist of calcite, except NAICA-1 which is aragonite.

  • Dupont, Valerie (2016) Data for "Kinetics study and modelling of steam methane reforming process over a NiO/Al2O3 catalyst in an adiabatic packed bed reactor" in International Journal of Hydrogen Energy. University of Leeds. Data file containing datasets used to generate the figures and tables in the paper. [Dataset] https://doi.org/10.5518/126. [Publication] http://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijhydene.2016.11.093

  • Data for the figures in the manuscript: S. K. Sahoo, H. Marin-Moreno, L. J. North, I. Falco-Suarez,B. N. Madhusudhan, A. I. Best and T. A. Minshull (2018).Presence and consequences of co-existing methane gas with hydrate under two phase water-hydrate stability conditions , Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JB015598

  • NERC Grant NE/M011488/1 X-ray powder diffraction patterns as xy datasets of limonites from Acoje (Philippines), Caldag (Turkey), Nkamouna (Cameroon), Piaui (Brazil) and Shevchenko (Kazakhstan) laterite deposits; reduced sulphide ore from Thakaringa Mine (Australia) and Captain deposit (Canada); processing residues from the Kevitsa Mine (Finland). The data were acquired during the NERC SoS Minerals CoG3 project between 2015 and 2018 using a PANAlytical X’Pert Pro diffractometer at the Natural History Museum, London, UK. Powdered samples were back loaded into a deep well holder, loaded into the instrument in reflection geometry and data collected using Co Kalpha radiation between 3 and 70 degrees 2Theta. These data were used primarily for phase identification. This may be useful within the mining sector, resource assessment, processing or prospecting, geo- or material scientists and processing engineers / metallurgists. The data were acquired in the Core Research Laboratories, Natural History Museum by the NHM CoG3 team. NERC grant: CoG3: The geology, geometallurgy and geomicrobiology of cobalt resources leading to new product streams

  • This is a partnership between Imperial College London and the British Geological Survey in which we combine our expertise in pore scale digital rock physics (DRP), reservoir condition Special Core Analysis (SCAL) and dynamic reservoir simulation to enhance modelling strategies for the prediction of the performance of CO2 storage sites leading to lower risk and optimised reservoir management. The proposal is at the forefront of the revolution in digital rock physics and will investigate pore-scale and core-scale processes of CO2 flow, dissolution and residual trapping in the laboratory and incorporate the results into existing and newly developed dynamic reservoir simulation models of major CO2 storage reservoirs in the UK. We leverage in-kind contributions of £213k in capital equipment and reservoir models. Building directly on a large body of experimental and simulation work, the outcomes of the proposed research will include the APGTF R&D roadmap targets of a multi-scale approach for 1.updated and risked first order CO2 storage capacity estimates , 2.an assessment of the value of different kinds of data (core samples, seismic) for strategic data acquisition targets and 3.robust strategies for reservoir management to enhance dissolution trapping and monitoring in the UK. The multiscale approach will be validated against field data from the Carbon Management Canada Field Research Station (CMC-FRS), using rock samples from the target reservoir intervals of the Medicine Hat and Belly River sandstone formations. An engagement and planning trip to the CMC-FRS will foster international engagement. Grant number: UKCCSRC-C2-197.

  • NERC Grant NE/M011488/1 Thermogravimetric Analysis profiles as xy datasets of limonites from Acoje (Philippines), Caldag (Turkey), Piaui (Brazil) and Shevchenko (Kazakhstan) laterite deposits. The data were acquired during the NERC SoS Minerals CoG3 project between 2015 and 2018 using a TA Instruments Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA) instrument at the Natural History Museum, London, UK. Powdered samples were loaded into the TGA and heated at 10 degrees C per minute up to 800 degrees C under a flowing N2 atmosphere. Information regarding the type and proportion of hydrous or volatile rich mineral phases can be obtained from the decomposition profile. This may be useful within the mining sector, resource assessment, processing or prospecting, geo- or material scientists and processing engineers / metallurgists. The data were acquired in the Earth Sciences Department, Natural History Museum by the NHM CoG3 team. NERC grant: CoG3: The geology, geometallurgy and geomicrobiology of cobalt resources leading to new product streams

  • This report forms part of the international SACS (Saline Aquifer CO2 Storage) project. The project aims to monitor and predict the behaviour of injected CO2 in the Utsira Sand reservoir at the Sleipner field in the northern North Sea, to assess the regional storage potential of the Utsira reservoir, and to simulate and model likely chemical interactions of CO2 with the host rock. This is the final report of Work Area 1 in SACS, whose aims were to provide a full geological characterisation of the Utsira Sand and its caprock. The report summarises the key findings of the component subtasks of Work Area 1. The report also provides references to the various SACS Technical Reports wherein the full details of the scientific work can be found. The report can be downloaded from http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/511461/.

  • The CO2 controlled release experiment “Quantifying and Monitoring Potential Ecosystem Impacts of Geological Carbon Storage” (QICS) assessed the impacts of potential CO2 leakage from sub-seabed carbon capture and storage reservoirs to the marine environment. During QICS, CO2 gas was released into shallow sediment in Ardmucknish Bay, Scotland, in the spring and summer of 2012. As part of this project, we investigated the effects of CO2 leakage on sedimentary phosphorus (P), an essential nutrient for marine productivity. We found no statistically significant effects during QICS, as the solid-phase P content in the sediment was constant before, during, and after exposure to CO2. However, laboratory experiments using marine sediment standard materials as well as QICS sediment revealed substantial differences among these different sediment types in their potential for P release during CO2 exposure. Employing the SEDEX sequential extraction technique to determine the sizes of the major P pools in the sediments, we showed that calcium-bound P can be easily released by CO2 exposure, whereas iron-bound P is a major sink of released P. The overall impacts of CO2 leakage on sediment P behavior appear to be low compared to natural variability. This is a publication in QICS Special Issue - International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Ayumi Tsukasaki et. al. Doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2014.12.023.

  • In January 1993, as part of the Joule II Non-nuclear Energy Research Programme, the European Commission initiated a two year study of the potential for the disposal of industrial quantifies of carbon dioxide underground, with a view to reducing emissions to the atmosphere. The participants in the study were the British Geological Survey (UK), TNO Institute of Applied Geoscience (The Netherlands), BRGM (France), CRE Group Ltd (UK), IKU Petroleum Research (Norway), RWE AG (Germany), University of Sunderland Renewable Energy Centre (UK) and Statoil (Norway). The objective of the study was to examine whether carbon dioxide emissions from large point sources such as power stations, could be disposed of safely, economically and with no adverse effects on man and the environment. Project No. CT92-0031.