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6593 record(s)

 

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From 1 - 10 / 6593
  • The World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 6 (CMIP6) data from the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace (IPSL) IPSL-CM6A-LR model output for the "Idealized climate impact of positive extratropical AMV anomaly pattern" (dcppC-amv-ExTrop-pos) experiment. These are available at the following frequencies: Amon, LImon, Lmon, Ofx, Omon, SImon and day. The runs included the ensemble members: r10i1p1f1, r11i1p1f1, r12i1p1f1, r13i1p1f1, r14i1p1f1, r15i1p1f1, r16i1p1f1, r17i1p1f1, r18i1p1f1, r19i1p1f1, r1i1p1f1, r20i1p1f1, r21i1p1f1, r22i1p1f1, r23i1p1f1, r24i1p1f1, r25i1p1f1, r2i1p1f1, r3i1p1f1, r4i1p1f1, r5i1p1f1, r6i1p1f1, r7i1p1f1, r8i1p1f1 and r9i1p1f1. CMIP6 was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the WCRP and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 6th Assessment Report (AR6).

  • WCRP CMIP5: Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma) CanCM4 model output for the 10-year hindcast/prediction initialized in year 1995 (decadal1995) experiment. These data cover the following realms: aerosol, atmos, land, landIce, ocean and seaIce; at the following frequencies: day, fx and mon. The runs included the ensemble members: r0i0p0, r10i1p1, r10i2p1, r1i1p1, r1i2p1, r2i1p1, r2i2p1, r3i1p1, r3i2p1, r4i1p1, r4i2p1, r5i1p1, r5i2p1, r6i1p1, r6i2p1, r7i1p1, r7i2p1, r8i1p1, r8i2p1, r9i1p1 and r9i2p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5).

  • Cirrus clouds play an important role in determining the radiation budget of the earth, but many of their properties remain uncertain, particularly their response to aerosol variations and to warming. Part of the reason for this uncertainty is the dependence of cirrus cloud properties on the cloud formation mechanism, which itself is strongly dependent on the local meteorological conditions. This classification system is designed to identify cirrus clouds by the cloud formation mechanism. Using re-analysis and satellite data, cirrus clouds are separated in four main types: orographic, frontal, convective and synoptic. Comparisons with convection-permitting model simulations and back-trajectory based analysis have shown that this classification can provide useful information on the cloud scale updraughts and the frequency of occurrence of liquid-origin ice, with the convective regime having higher updraughts and a greater occurrence of liquid-origin ice compared to the synoptic regimes (see description paper). This classification is designed to be easily implemented in global climate models - the observational classification results are made available make this comparison easier. The classification has been generated globally for the years 2003-2013 inclusive. Making use of the moderate resolution imaging spectrometer (MODIS) on-board the Aqua satellite, the classification exists only at 13:30 local solar time each day. The regimes used within this classification are defined as follows (further details are given in the description paper) Orographic - proximity to regions of large-scale topography variation Frontal - satellite detected cirrus clouds that intersect to atmospheric fronts determined from reanalysis data Convective - satellite detected cirrus clouds in regions of large scale ascent determined from reanalysis data Synoptic - Not assigned as one of the other regimes. Data are gridded NetCDF V4 files, provided on a regular longitude-latitude grid at a 1 by 1 degree resolution across the whole globe. The files provide the classification at 13:30 local solar time (the satellite overpass time) and are at a daily resolution, within a folder defining the year. The filename structure is: {year}/IC-CIR.{year}.{day_of_year}.v1.nc where {year} is the year of the data and {doy of year} starts with 001 on the first of January. Further details about the data, including comparisons to convection-resolving model simulations can be found in the description paper (Gryspeerdt et al., ACP, 2018).

  • WCRP CMIP5: The CNRM-CERFACS team CNRM-CM5 model output for the ESM fixed climate 1 (esmFixClim1) experiment. These data cover the following realms: atmos, ocean and ocnBgchem; at the following frequencies: mon and yr. The runs included the ensemble member: r1i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5). The CNRM-CERFACS team consisted of the following agencies: Centre National de Recherches Meteorologiques (CNRM) and Centre Europeen de Recherche et Formation Avancees en Calcul Scientifique (CERFACS).

  • Hyperspectral remote sensing measurements using the INTA Airborne Hyperspectral Scanner and INTA Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager 1500i instruments onboard the CASA 212 RS - INTA aircraft for the EDOCROS - Early detection of crop water and nutritional stress by remotely sensed indicators project (flight reference: intacasa-rs_20100719_edocros_D1). Data were collected over the Piacenza, Italy area.

  • Airborne atmospheric measurements from core and non-core instrument suites data on board the FAAM BAE-146 aircraft collected for Methane and other greenhouse gases in the Arctic - Measurements, process studies and Modelling (MAMM) as part of the NERC Arctic Research Programme (ARP) project.

  • WCRP CMIP5: Met Office Hadley Centre (MOHC) HadGEM2-ES model output for the 1 percent per year CO2 (1pctCO2) experiment. These data cover the following realms: ocean and ocnBgchem; at the following frequencies: mon and yr. The runs included the ensemble member: r1i1p1. The WCRP Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5 (CMIP5), was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 5th Assessment Report (AR5).

  • The World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 6 (CMIP6) data from the the MIROC team MIROC6 model output for the "historical prescribed SSTs and historical forcing" (histSST) experiment. These are available at the following frequencies: Amon and CFmon. The runs included the ensemble member: r1i1p1f1. CMIP6 was a global climate model intercomparison project, coordinated by PCMDI (Program For Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison) on behalf of the WCRP and provided input for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 6th Assessment Report (AR6). The the MIROC team team consisted of the following agencies: Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute (AORI), Centre for Climate System Research - National Institute for Environmental Studies (CCSR-NIES) and Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute (AORI).

  • Synoptic charts from the Met Office's Cyclone Database, constructed from output stored in the database covering 2000-2005. The database holds lists of cyclones, their types and structural information about each cyclone and associated features as derived from analysis of the UK Met Office Unified Model. Database raw data available in its own dataset within this collection.

  • COBRA (impact of COmbined iodine and Bromine Release on the Arctic atmosphere) is a UK IPY (International Polar Year) consortium that aims to investigate the release mechanisms of iodine in the Arctic and the potential combined effects of iodine and bromine on its atmosphere. The team measured reactive inorganic halogens (BrO, IO, OIO, I2), O3, Hg, HOx, HCHO, NOx, VOCs and reactive halocarbons from temporary laboratories located on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay, north of Kuujjuarapik, during February-March 2008. Met balloons and O3 sondes were launched daily. COBRA set up an ice camp and flux chamber experiments ~500 m into the bay to directly measure halogen emissions and ozone deposition, and measured physical, chemical and biological characteristics of the sea-ice (and potentially of frost flowers) at different depths. The project is linked with OOTI, which carried out a simultaneous field experiment at Kuujjuarapik.